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How Teenagers Learned To Hate Joseph Kony

The social media campaign by Invisible Children has drawn some 60 million viewers, many of them teenagers, to a video about a mass murderer in Africa. It will be closely studied by other nonprofit groups hoping to gain attention for their cause. Lesson one: It took years to lay the groundwork.
NPR

U.S., Afghan Forces Try To Rebuild Trust

More than 70 members of the NATO coalition have been killed by men in Afghan police or army uniforms in the last five years. After several recent attacks, new measures are being put in place.
NPR

Greece Takes Critical Step Toward Avoiding Bankruptcy

Most of its creditors have agreed to swap their bonds for others worth much less — a move that was needed before Greece could get a much-needed $172 billion bailout.
NPR

Pace Of Iran's Nuclear Program Is 'Overestimated'

Iranians have agreed to meet with Western officials to discuss their nuclear program, amid increasing Western concern about its purpose. Steve Inskeep talks to Paul Pillar about his article in The Washington Monthly entitled "We Can Live with a Nuclear Iran." Pillar teaches in the security studies program at Georgetown University.
NPR

Viral Video Educates World On Ugandan War Lord

The American non-profit group Invisible Children aims to raise awareness about Ugandan war lord Joseph Kony. A video the group made has gone viral on the Internet. Steve Inskeep talks to Barbara Among, a journalist with Uganda's Daily Monitor, to find out what Ugandans think of the campaign.
NPR

U.S. Command Fights Terrorists On African Soil

The recent spectacular rescue of an American aid worker from Somali pirates put a spotlight on the U.S. military's newest regional command, Africom. The Africa Command was created in 2007. Morning Edition's Renee Montagne talks to General Carter Ham about U.S. military involvement in Africa and fighting terrorist groups on African soil.
NPR

Trauma, Not Radiation, Is Key Concern In Japan

Experts say health effects from the radiation released by last year's nuclear disaster will be minimal. But the lasting psychological trauma from the tsunami, including the loss of life and livelihoods, will be an ongoing struggle.

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