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Komla Dumor: The African Journalist Who 'Lifted The Continent'

Dumor hosted the BBC television program Focus on Africa and was probably the best-known journalist on the continent. He roamed Africa for years and was known for explaining Africa — the good and the bad — with clarity, context and compassion.
NPR

New Delhi's 'Agitator' Administrator Ends Unusual Protest

Newly elected Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal led a two-day sit-in to protest alleged inaction by the city's police force, which is controlled by the national government. The protest ended with a stitched-together deal that's been called more of a climb-down than a compromise.
NPR

Hopping Mad: Rabbit In Mandela Statue's Ear Is On Burrowed Time

Two South African sculptors who were refused permission to engrave their signatures on the giant statue of Nelson Mandela came up with a novel solution: They hid a bronze rabbit in the statue's ear. Now, they have to remove the addition.
NPR

Antarctic Travelers Who Got Stuck In Ice Finally Get Home

The 52 scientists and paying passengers were aboard a ship that got stuck in the ice on Christmas Eve. It was about 10 days before they were helicoptered to another ship nearby. Who will pay the $2 million or so it cost to rescue the group? That's being negotiated.
NPR

Almost No Poor Nations By 2035? That's What Bill Gates Says

In his annual letter about the work of his foundation, the Microsoft co-founder says once-impoverished nations have already made tremendous progress, and more will follow their lead.
NPR

'Accusations And Acrimony' At Start Of Talks On Syria

Syria's foreign minister said the opposition is made up of traitors. The opposition's delegate asked the world "who do you believe?" Secretary of State John Kerry laid the blame for civilians' deaths at the feet of the Assad regime. Prospects for progress appear to be dim.
NPR

What's At Stake In The Syrian Peace Conference

With the Syrian civil war still raging, a peace conference opens in Switzerland that will include some but not all of the factions involved in the fighting. A breakthrough looks like a long shot.
NPR

Ambassador Kennedy Criticizes Japan's Dolphin Hunt

The dolphin roundup by a Japanese community is an annual hunt. But this time, new U.S. ambassador to Japan Caroline Kennedy has weighed in with displeasure. That puts her on the side of several wildlife and animal rights advocates who've condemned the annual slaughter. The Japanese defend it as traditional — just as the U.S. does with native Alaskans who kill whales.
NPR

In Op-Ed, Jeffrey Argues For U.S. To Do More In Iraq

The death toll in Iraq this month is nearly 700 and rising — the result of a wave of bombings and open clashes between government-led Iraqi security forces and Sunni extremists with ties to al Qaida. Steve Inskeep talks to former U.S. Ambassador to Iraq James Jeffrey, who says the U.S. should be doing more in Iraq.
NPR

Peace Conference On Syria Opens In Switzerland

The Syrian peace conference is underway as diplomats make public statements filled with accusations and acrimony. The civil war has gone on nearly three years — killing more than 130,000 people and displacing some 9 million others. Much of the fight hinges on whether Syrian President Bashar Assad should remain power.

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