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Tracing Her Tanzanian Roots In 'A Lot Like You'

Director Eliaichi Kimaro is a first-generation American with a Tanzanian father and Korean mother. When her dad retired and moved back to Tanzania, she followed him to do a film about his side of the family, one she didn't know much about. Her work unveiled a shocking history she didn't expect. Kimaro talks with host Michel Martin about her documentary A Lot Like You, which is part of this year's Asian American International Film Festival.
NPR

Is Mali Becoming The New Afghanistan?

The West African country Mali was hailed as a successful democracy for decades. But a rebellion in the north and a coup d'etat in the south has led to turbulent times for the country. Host Michel Martin speaks to NPR's Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton who is reporting in Mali.
WAMU 88.5

Friday News Roundup - International

The European Central Bank left its main interest rate unchanged, but ECB head Mario Draghi signaled the bank could purchase bonds and lower borrowing costs in the future. The battle for Aleppo raged on as Syrian rebels' handling of pro-government militiamen drew criticism. President Barack Obama announced new sanctions on Iran's energy sector. And India suffered the worst blackout in history, which left 670 million people without power. James Kitfield of National Journal, Susan Glasser of Foreign Policy magazine and David Ignatius of The Washington Post join Diane for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

NPR

Boris Gets Left Hanging, But The Joke's Rarely On London's Savvy Mayor

Some Londoners may not be much interested in sports - but one image from these Olympic Games will surely remain with them, long after the cheers and crowds have faded away. It is the spectacle of their mayor, Boris Johnson, brandishing a Union flag in either hand, and dangling helplessly from a zip wire 20 feet above the ground.
NPR

A Diplomat's Extended Visit With Al-Qaida In Mali

A former Canadian diplomat, who was once held by al-Qaida, says the group's rise in Mali poses a significant threat. And, says Robert Fowler, he sees no possibility of negotiation with al-Qaida based on members of the group he met during his captivity.
NPR

Medals And Scandals: An Olympic Update

Thursday is day seven of the Summer Olympics. Another big moment is on tap for American swimmers Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte. The host country looks to add to its suddenly growing tally of medals. And badminton marches on, its image battered by scandal. Renee Montagne talks to NPR's Tom Goldman about all things Olympics.
NPR

The Power Of Trash Talk For Bhutanese Archers

In women's archery at the Olympics, a sole American competitor remains. Khatuna Lorig beat many competitors, including the one holding up Bhutan's archery tradition, Sherab Zam. NPR's Mike Pesca reports a Bhutanese tradition may be the reason for its ranking.
NPR

Syrian Rebels Gain Ground, And Criticsm

Rebels appear to be in control of large parts of the city of Aleppo. Government forces responded with heavy fire, killing dozens of civilians. But rights groups criticized rebels after a video reportedly showed they summarily killed four government loyalists. NPR's Anthony Kuhn talks to Steve Inskeep about the latest.

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