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Cambodian Court Case Stokes Fear Of Crackdown

A Cambodian court has convicted a pro-democracy journalist on charges of inciting a tiny village to secede from the rest of the country. Critics say the case is part of wider efforts by Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen to stifle dissent, and is a sign that the country's democracy is regressing.
NPR

No More 'Lying': Law Bolsters Transgender Argentines

Argentina recently passed a law that recognizes the right of transgender citizens to change the name and sex written on their ID cards and other documents, with no medical or legal procedures. Other countries have similar measures, but Argentina's law sets a new standard for making the process easy.
NPR

Supreme Court Weighs Major Human-Rights Case

At issue is whether a group of Nigerians granted political asylum in the U.S. can use the Alien Tort Statute to sue Anglo-Dutch energy company Shell for its alleged practices in Nigeria. The justices sharply questioned both the plaintiffs' attorney as well as Shell's lawyer.
NPR

In Syria, Tensions And Buildings Burn

Historic shops in Syria's largest city burned as rebels and government fighters continue to battle for control of Aleppo. Activists estimate 30,000 people have been killed so far. NPR's Deborah Amos and Andrew Tabler of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy weigh in on the crisis in Syria.
NPR

Remembering To Never Forget: Dominican Republic's 'Parsley Massacre'

In October 1937, dictator Rafael Trujillo's soldiers identified Haitians by asking them to say perejil (Spanish for parsley). If someone did not trill the "r," he was likely to be killed. As many as 20,000 Haitians died.
NPR

Iran's President Goes Home, His Cameraman Stays Behind

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad brought a large entourage with him when he visited New York last week. One of them, a cameraman, stayed behind and is seeking asylum in the U.S., a lawyer says.

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