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London Starts Digging Massive Tunnels For Transport

Forty years after it was first proposed, digging has begun on a major new railway link under central London. Two giant earth-eaters are nibbling away at the ground making tunnels that eventually will connect mainline train services across the city. Guest host Jacki Lyden talks with NPR's Philip Reeves in London about Europe's biggest civil engineering project.
NPR

Despite Restrictions, Gaza Finds A Way To Build

The Palestinian territory is in the midst of a construction boom, more than three years after a major Israeli assault that left much of the territory in ruins. Since building materials haven't been allowed in legally since 2007, items like cement have been smuggled in through tunnels from Egypt.
NPR

Greek Bailout Is Accompanied By Greek Resentment

Debt-beleaguered Greece has secured a second international bailout, but for many Greeks, the conditions set by their EU partners are a breach of sovereignty.
NPR

Why? Few Clues From Afghan Attack Suspect's Home

The U.S. soldier alleged to have killed 16 Afghan civilians in a nighttime rampage has been identified as Staff Sgt. Robert Bales of Lake Tapps, Wash. The people of Bales' rural community are bewildered; one neighbor describes him as "just one of the guys."
NPR

Provocative Chinese Cartoonists Find An Outlet Online

In a Nemo-inspired cartoon, a menacing fish lures unsuspecting little fish with a glowing picture of a Communist hero. A South Park-like animation skewers China's elites. These are among the works of a new generation of Chinese political cartoonists who are using social media to evade censors.
NPR

Soldier Accused Of Killing 16 Afghans Headed To U.S.

Melissa Block talks with Martin Kaste about the status of the U.S. soldier accused of killing 16 Afghan civilians in a rampage near his base. The soldier has not been named, but his lawyer has spoken to the press. On Friday, an Army General spoke to reporters at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, near Seattle.
NPR

Why Are Some Countries Rich And Others Poor?

A new book called Why Nations Fail argues that a lot comes down to politics — not just laws, but also a country's norms.

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