International

RSS Feed
NPR

What China's Thinkers Need Most Is Also Most Elusive

Chinese artist Yang Weidong has devoted the past four years to asking more than 300 Chinese intellectuals a deceptively simple question: "What do you need?" The resounding answer is "freedom." The results reflect both a sense of crisis and progress, in that such criticism can be openly voiced.
NPR

High School Draws Chinese Students, Tuition Dollars

A record number of Chinese students are attending U.S. colleges and universities. In Michigan, a public high school is getting in on the trend. Lake Shore High School will host 88 full-time students from Beijing during the 2012-2013 academic year.
WAMU 88.5

Ending Violence Against Women Worldwide

The public execution of an Afghan woman falsely accused of adultery has prompted international outrage. New efforts to curb violence against women.

NPR

'Today,' 'Tomorrow,' and Nine Other Words You Can't Search For In China

It's the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown. China's Internet censors are blocking even more than usual.
NPR

Israel Presents Itself As Haven For Gay Community

Israel's government is backing a public-relations campaign styling the country as a haven for the gay community. Israel offers many legal protections to gays in a region that is typically hostile to them. But activists say the progress came in spite of — not because of — the government
NPR

Outside Countries Disagree On Next Steps In Syria

As conditions within Syria deteriorate and civil war seems increasingly likely, other countries disagree about what to do. Robert Siegel speaks with former U.S. Deputy Secretary of State James Steinberg. Steinberg is now a dean of the Maxwell School of Syracuse University.
NPR

Economic Crisis Looms Larger In Spain Than Greece

Spain may be the most problematic country in the Eurozone at the moment. Recession is deepening in the European Union's fourth-largest economy, borrowing costs are soaring and banks find themselves in ever more turbulent waters. Robert Siegel talks with Fred Bergsten, director of the Peterson Institute for International Economics, about how Spain found itself in this mess, and what the consequences are for the rest of Europe.

Pages