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Syria: Does The U.S. And Russia Deal Go Far Enough?

The world watches and waits to hear if the Assad government will give up Syria's chemical weapons stock. In the meantime, George Perkovich of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace talks with host Michel Martin about Israel's view on the Syrian conflict.
NPR

Ray Suarez On Latino Americans: Past Is Prologue?

Over 50 million Latin Americans live in the United States. Host Michel Martin speaks with veteran reporter Ray Suarez about his new book Latino Americans: The 500-Year Legacy That Shaped A Nation.
NPR

Sarin Attack On Syrian Civilians Is A 'War Crime,' U.N. Says

The Aug. 21 attack near Damascus killed civilians, "including many children," and constitutes a "war crime," says U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. He expressed his "profound shock and regret" at the findings.
NPR

Brazilian Believers Of Hidden Religion Step Out Of Shadows

Candomblé, an Afro-Brazilian religion, has been widely practiced by people of African descent in Brazil but mostly in secret — until now. After centuries of slavery and discrimination, Brazil's Afro-Brazilian community is proudly celebrating its African roots.
NPR

South Korean Soldiers Kill Man Trying To Cross To North

While thousands of North Koreans have made their way to the South, the number of incidents that go in the other direction are exceedingly rare.
NPR

Are Latinos Turning Away From Traditional Media For Information?

NPR's Tell Me More with Michel Martin hosted a Google+ Hangout on air, focusing on "Emerging Latinos and Innovations."
NPR

Former U.N. Inspector: Syria Plan 'Optimistic,' Requires Troops

The U.S.-Russia plan to rid Syria of chemical weapons by next summer faces many hurdles and includes "unrealistic" deadlines, says former U.N. weapons inspector David Kay, who previously has worked on efforts to find chemical weapons in Iraq.
NPR

How To Watch As The Costa Concordia Is (Hopefully) Righted

The cruise ship ran aground and slumped over on its starboard side off the coast of Tuscany in January 2012. Thirty-two people died. The effort to pull it upright is said to be the biggest such operation ever. At 114,000 tons, the ship is twice the size of the Titanic.
NPR

Debate Revs As Decision Stalls Over Oil Pipeline From Canada

Five years ago, a Canadian company proposed building the Keystone XL pipeline to connect Canada's tar sands oil development with the big U.S. refineries on the Gulf Coast. The southern stretch of this pipeline is nearly finished, but the northern stretch is still under study.
NPR

Weapons Inspector Points Out Challenges Facing Deal On Syria

Steve Inskeep talks to David Kay, former chief U.N. weapons inspector in Iraq about the Russia-U.S. brokered plan to destroy Syria's chemical weapons.

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