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In the Beginning, There Were ... Dumplings?

From Warsaw to Wuhan, people around the world love dumplings. They're tasty little packages that can be made of any grain and stuffed with whatever the locals crave. But where did they come from? Some think prehistoric people may have been cooking them up.
NPR

Pain, Loss And Tears Come With Medal Of Honor

Staff Sergeant Ty Michael Carter is receiving the nation's highest military honor. He feels privileged, but says "I would never tell any soldier or service member, 'Hey, go out and get the Medal of Honor', because of the amount of pain and loss and tears that has to be shed in order to receive it."
NPR

World Reacts To Alleged Syrian Chemical Attack

Opposition groups have accused the Syrian government of using chemical weapons earlier this week against civilians in a suburb of Damascus. Syrian President Bashar Assad denies the claims and has agreed to allow U.N. inspectors to investigate. Meanwhile, President Obama and others in Washington are weighing different response options.
NPR

'Heart' Of Iranian Identity Reimagined For A New Generation

Shahnameh is the Persian Odyssey, with ancient legends and myths put into verse. A new English language version brings the 1,000-year-old text into the modern age, with ornate recompositions of Persian miniature paintings.
NPR

For Arab World's Christians, An Uncertain Fate

As Egypt plunges into unrest amid the military-backed government's crackdown on demonstrators, the country's Christian minority has been targeted by Islamic extremists. Their fate mirrors conditions faced by Christians across the Middle East.
NPR

Ancient African Religion Finds Roots In America

African-American followers of Yoruba say it offers a spiritual path as well as a sense of cultural belonging. Followers of Yoruba are adapting its teachings to a modern context, while connecting with their heritage.
NPR

Tens Of Thousands Flee Syria After Alleged Chemical Attacks

Thousands of Syrian refugees entered Iraq last week, fleeing the violence between extremist groups and Kurdish militias in northeastern Syria. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin speaks with Alan Paul of the charity Save the Children about the flow of refugees entering Iraq.
NPR

Evidence Points To Chemical Weapon Use In Syria

While the use of chemical weapons by Syria's government forces remains officially unproven, many analysts say there are strong signs indicating their use. Host Rachel Martin talks with Gary Samore, a former White House coordinator for arms control and weapons of mass destruction, about how the claims are being evaluated.
NPR

Health Fears Grow In Damascus With Reported Chemical Attack

Rebels say the government conducted the deadly attack on Wednesday, though President Assad's forces deny involvement. Still, residents in and around the Syrian city are worried food, air and water might carry toxins.
NPR

Tons Of Molten Glass Go Into Making Mirror For Giant Telescope

One of seven large mirrors for the 72-foot telescope will be spun cast at the University of Arizona on Saturday.

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