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U.S. 'Deeply Regrets' Russia's Adoption Ban

The State Department says it "deeply regrets" the passage of a law in Russia ending adoptions of Russian children by American families and restricting Russian civil society groups that work with American partners. Russian President Vladimir Putin, who signed the law Friday, described it as an "appropriate response" to U.S. legislation that imposes visa bans on Russians accused of gross human rights violations. The Russians seem to be upping the ante, however, and orphans are caught in the middle.
NPR

Same-Sex Marriage And Adoption: Unresolved Issues In France

Opposition to a bill allowing gay couples to adopt has been unexpectedly fierce in the country, which legalized civil unions more than a decade ago. In a rare move, and to the surprise of many, even the French Catholic Church has become involved in the debate.
NPR

Victim Of Brutal Rape In India Dies In Singapore Hospital

A woman who survived a brutal gang-rape on a bus in India has died, according to reports. Earlier Friday, hospital officials in Singapore, where the 23-year-old student was being treated, had warned that her condition was worsening.
NPR

Is It Morally Wrong For U.S. To Export Coal?

The Seattle area is seeing widespread, well-organized opposition to an export industry: coal. Thousands of people have turned out to express their disgust with a plan to build export terminals on Puget Sound to ship American coal to Asia. Opponents cite noise, traffic delays, coal dust and global warming.
NPR

International Adoptions On Downward Trend

President Vladimir Putin on Friday signed a bill banning Americans from adopting Russian children. U.S. adoptions from Russia had already been on the decline over the last several years — reflecting a broader downward trend in international adoptions. For more on adoption trends, host Audie Cornish talks with Adam Pertman, executive director of the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute.
NPR

Suicide Hotline Fights To Keep Vets And Troops Alive

For the first time in a decade of war, more active-duty troops took their own lives this year than died fighting in Afghanistan. The national suicide hotline is one way the Department of Veterans Affairs is trying to help troops and vets.

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