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Thailand Official: Martial Law Is Good For Tourists

With tourism down 20 percent, Thailand is looking for novel ways to lure visitors. According to the head of the tourist authority, military rule means it's extremely safe to visit.
NPR

USAID Head Speaks Of Heroic Efforts — And Heroes — In West Africa

Rajiv Shah, the head of the U.S. Agency for International Development, gives an update on the construction of new hospitals — and the outlook for Ebola — in afflicted parts of West Africa.
NPR

Crude Oil Prices Drop As Saudis Refuse To Cut Production

The price of oil is down and continues to drop. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is to thank, in part, for the lower prices at the pump as it fights to keep its place in the market.
NPR

Kurds Hoping To Fight ISIS In Kobani Are Trapped By Turkish Suspicions

Turkey's deep suspicions of Kurds are hampering efforts to aid the besieged Syrian border town. Turkish authorities are stopping Kurdish men en route to Kobani and investigating them as terrorists.
NPR

'Times' Report Details Pentagon's Mishandling Of Iraq Chemical Weapons

Melissa Block talks with C.J. Chivers, foreign correspondent for The New York Times, about his in-depth reporting on abandoned chemical weapons in Iraq and their casualties.
NPR

Oscar Pistorius Case Draws Attention To Judge's Background

The South African athlete was back in court following last month's culpable homicide in the shooting death of his girlfriend. Melissa Block talks to reporter Natasya Tay about the judge in the case.
NPR

Bodies In Mexico Mass Grave Apparently Not Those Of Missing Students

The mystery surrounding the disappearance of 43 students last month has deepened. Mexican authorities say remains found in a mass grave outside the town of Iquala are not those of the students.
NPR

Critics Say 'Inherent Resolve' Mission Against ISIS Is Underwhelming

After more than two months of U.S. airstrikes in Iraq and an expansion of that campaign to Syria, critics complain too little has been accomplished — and too little is being done.
NPR

Ebola Evacuees: Who Are They, Where'd They Go, How'd They Fare?

They caught the virus. Or had contact with a patient that put them at high risk. And they were flown out of West Africa for treatment — at a cost as high as $200,000 per person.
NPR

For A U.S. Hostage Facing Death, Syria Meant A New Life

Abdul-Rahman Kassig went to Iraq as a U.S. soldier and returned to the Middle East to establish his own aid mission. Now he's a captive of the Islamic State in Syria, which is threatening to kill him.

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