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Dozens Dead, 'Huge' Number Missing In Philippine Ferry Sinking

Survivors say people were trapped below deck when the ferry sank "in minutes" after it collided with a cargo ship near the country's second-largest city of Cebu.
NPR

Eurozone Rebound: Blip Or Trend?

The eurozone emerged from an 18-month-long recession. Host Scott Simon talks with Simon Johnson, MIT professor and former chief economist at the International Monetary Fund, about positive news from the eurozone, and what impact that might have on the U.S. economy.
NPR

Despite Bloodshed, Many Egyptians Support Military

Egypt witnessed the bloodiest day in its modern history this week. Most of the dead are Muslim Brotherhood supporters, but there's little sympathy as the military and media ramp up a campaign to brand them as terrorists.
NPR

To Care For U.S. Kids, Filipinas Leave Their Own Behind

Tens of thousands of Filipinas work as nannies in U.S. households. Many leave their own children in the care of relatives back home, a wrenching but often unavoidable decision in the impoverished Southeast Asian nation.
NPR

Egyptian Forces Reportedly Clear Mosque Of Morsi Backers

Hundreds of supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi have taken refuge in a Cairo mosque and are refusing to leave.
NPR

Kyrgyz Officials Shut Down Alcohol-Smuggling Pipeline

The conduit with neighboring Kazakhstan was reportedly used to send "thousands of liters" of pure grain alcohol undetected across the border.
NPR

In Egypt, Another Day Of Clashes And Violence

Islamist protesters clashed with security forces in several parts of Cairo as well as other cities on Friday. Dozens were killed or wounded. The Muslim Brotherhood ordered the protest marches on what it's calling a Day of Rage. The government warned that security forces would use live ammunition to protect state institutions.
NPR

Pickering: U.S. Has To Carefully Parse Its Response In Egypt

Robert Siegel talks with former Ambassador Thomas Pickering about how the U.S. might approach the crisis in Egypt.
NPR

Peru's Oil Rush Threatens Native Tribes, Again

Three ministers in Peru have resigned over pressure to continue oil exploration in the Camisea area of Peru. In the 1980s uncontacted tribes were partially wiped out by diseases brought in by oil workers. Now there are plans to expand the project into areas where other uncontacted tribes are living. Among the oil companies involved is American hunt oil.
NPR

Embarrassed, Thai University Removes Anti-Cheating Hats

A photo of Kasetsart University students wearing the cumbersome headgear during an exam went viral, garnering disapproval.

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