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NPR

English Soccer Team Sees New Level Of Fan Dedication

As players for the team were sightseeing in Vietnam, they noticed a man in an Arsenal shirt running alongside the team bus. He kept pace for more than 3 miles. Players began chanting, "Sign him up!"
NPR

In India, At Least 22 Children Die After Eating Poisoned School Lunch

The tragedy sparked violent protests in the eastern state of Bihar. A mob smashed the windows of police buses and overturned a police booth. All of the children who died were between the ages of 8 and 11.
NPR

Chinese Museum Closes Because Of Fakes

A visiting writer noticed some of the fakes. Like an ancient artifact bearing Chinese characters that first appeared in the 20th century. And an ancient vase bearing modern looking cartoon animals.
NPR

How Ramadan Affects Guantanamo Bay Detainees' Hunger Strike

A federal judge has refused to stop the force-feeding of Guantanamo Bay inmates on a hunger strike. David Greene talks to Carol Rosenberg, of the Miami Herald, who's just returned from the Guantanamo Bay detention center in Cuba, where she's been reporting on the prisoners' hunger strike.
NPR

Civil Servants In Greece 'Sit-In' To Fight For Their Jobs

Greece's two largest unions held a general strike and anti-austerity demonstrations on Tuesday. Now, the country's parliament will debate and vote on deep civil service cuts. Greece must downsize the public sector in order for it to keep getting international bailout loans.
NPR

Holding Zimbabwe's Leaders Accountable Through Poetry

As Zimbabwe prepares for hotly contested elections later this month, there's pressure on politicians to avoid violence and follow through on promises. One group making sure the country's leaders do what they promised is the group Zimbabwe Poets for Human Rights.
NPR

Sickle Cell Anemia Is On The Rise Worldwide

The number of babies born with the life-threatening disease will climb by a third in the next 40 years, scientists say. The vast majority of sickle cell cases will occur in developing countries, which don't have the resources to treat deadly complications arising from the genetic disorder.
NPR

In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map

A billion people worldwide live in slums, largely invisible to city services and governments — but not to satellites. A global movement is putting mapping technology in the hands of slum dwellers to persuade governments and the residents themselves to see these shadow cities in a whole new light. NPR's Gregory Warner visits one slum in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi.
NPR

Some Worry Egypt Could Become A Repressive Police State

Some of Egypt's liberal politicians are worried that they've allied with the enemy against the ousted president. After the January 2011 revolution, the military ruled during the transitional period for 18 months, when hundreds were killed in protests. Now the military is squarely back in power with the backing of millions of people. Some say there is a danger that Egypt's deep state will take hold again and turn the nation back into a police state. But they are still squarely in the minority.
NPR

LISTEN: 'Light Warlpiri,' The New Language In Australia

Stories of dying languages are all too common. A University of Michigan linguistics professor has a completely different tale about the new language she discovered in an aboriginal community of Australia.

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