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China Unveils Major Economic Changes

The Communist Party said it would loosen restrictions on foreign investment in e-commerce and other businesses, and allow private competition in state-dominated sectors. The announcements are being described as China's biggest economic overhaul in two decades.
NPR

What Are The Lives of Chinese Factory Workers Really Like?

Behind all our material goods, from iPhones to sneakers, is a narrative of exploited Chinese workers with bleak lives. Reporter Leslie T. Chang says that's a disrespectful narrative. She sought out workers in a Chinese megacities and tells their stories.
NPR

Where Does General Tso Chicken Actually Come From?

Journalist Jennifer 8. Lee talks about her hunt for the origins of familiar Chinese-American dishes — exploring the hidden spots where these two cultures have combined to form a new cuisine.
NPR

Misconceptions

There are some truths that we believe in wholeheartedly — but what if we're completely wrong? Once we separate fact from fiction, how do our perceptions change? In this hour, TED speakers move beyond conventional wisdom to reveal complex realities about what we think we know to be true.
NPR

Ikea's Typhoon Aid Overshadows China's Aid To Philippines

The Swedish furniture store Ikea is sending a $2.6 million aid package. China is sending aid worth $1.6 million. It first offered $100,000.
NPR

China Eases One-Child Policy, Ends Labor Camp System

In order to have a second child, one parent would have to be an only child under the new policy. Previously, both parents had to be only children. China has been loosening the policy for years as it tries to combat a gender imbalance as well as a labor shortage.
NPR

China Expected To Loosen One-Child Policy

A state-run news service says the government will make a big change to the policy designed to restrain population growth. That policy has also led to a relative shortfall of young people and especially of girls.
NPR

Philippines Has A 'Love-Hate Relationship' With U.S.

The U.S. relationship with the Philippines goes way back. University of Hawaii Professor Patricio Abinales, who was born in the Philippines, tells Steve Inskeep his country's love-hate relationship with the U.S. began in the late 19th century after America purchased the islands from Spain.
NPR

Devastated Philippine City No Stranger To Calamity

Novelist Gina Apostol grew up in Tacloban before moving to America. She has relatives in cities near Tacloban, who have been making their way to the shattered area to try to help other family members. She says her family worries about the law and order situation there.
NPR

Wait Continues In The Philippines: 'We Have Nothing To Eat'

While the aid effort continues to ramp up, many in the typhoon-ravaged nation are still waiting for food, water and adequate shelter. "Nothing. Nothing happened," one survivor said Friday after waiting hours for food aid that never arrived.

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