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The Nation That Elects The Most Women Is ...

In Rwanda, nearly two-thirds of Parliament consists of women, a trend that developed after the country's genocide. Cuba is third, with women making up 50 percent of its legislators. The U.S. is 99th.
NPR

The Arab Activists Who Refuse To Bow To The Giant

A new film We Are The Giant follows six people during the Arab Spring. Tell Me More's Celeste Headlee speaks to co-producer Razan Ghalayini and activist Maryam Al Khawaja.
NPR

Former U.S. General In Africa: 'I Think We Can' Help Find Nigerian Girls

Carter Ham's former command will be part of the U.S. effort to hunt for schoolgirls who were kidnapped three weeks ago by an Islamist extremist group in Nigeria.
NPR

Brutal Attack On Nigerian Village Kills More Than 125

The violence is suspected to be the work of Islamist extremist group Boko Haram, which has also claimed responsibility for abducting more than 250 girls from a school last month.
NPR

Ukraine's Separatists To Proceed With Vote, Despite Putin

A day after Russian President Vladimir Putin told separatists in Ukraine they should postpone a referendum on secession, leaders of a militant group say they'll hold the vote this Sunday as planned.
NPR

U.S. Team To Assist Nigeria In Locating Kidnapped School Girls

Steve Inskeep talks to retired Gen. Carter Ham about U.S. assistance to Nigeria to help locate and rescue kidnapped school girls. Ham was the commander of the U.S. African Command from 2011 to 2013.
NPR

Peacekeeping Missions Lack Trust In Central African Republic

Renee Montagne talks to Graeme Wood, of The New Republic, about his trip to Central African. He traveled with support from the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum's Center for the Prevention of Genocide.
NPR

Assad Troops Retake Homs, Symbol Of Syria's Uprising

Syrian rebels have pulled out the central city of Homs, which was known as the birthplace of the uprising against the government. Forces backing President Assad have retaken the town.
NPR

Civil War Invades An Elephant Sanctuary: One Researcher's Escape

Andrea Turkalo spent 22 years in central Africa, studying rare forest elephants. Then civil war forced her to flee — and poachers killed many of the elephants she'd shared a life with.
NPR

Legendary D.C. Law Firm To Pay Chevron In Ecuador Pollution Case

Rain forest residents had sued the oil giant, and Washington law firm Patton Boggs tried to make the company pay up. But Chevron sued the law firm for fraud — and is now due $15 million.

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