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Why No One's Going To Timbuktu These Days

The coup in Mali earlier this year and occupation of the north by al-Qaida affiliates have devastated the economy, especially the tourism sector, the country's third-largest revenue generator. Tourist arrivals have plummeted, and all Malians, from river guides to tailors, are suffering.
NPR

What Should The U.S. Learn From Europe's Woes?

As President Obama and lawmakers try to find a formula for spending cuts and tax increases, they might look across the Atlantic for insights from those who have been wrestling with budget problems. The first lesson from Europe's "fiscal consolidation" experiences: It will hurt.
NPR

Germans OK Patriot Missiles To Defend Turkey

Germany's Cabinet on Thursday approved sending German Patriot air defense missiles to Turkey to protect the NATO member against possible attacks from Syria. It's a major step toward a possible Western military role in the Syrian conflict.
NPR

Architect Oscar Niemeyer, Who Designed Brazil's Capital, Dies

The Pritzker Prize-winning architect was known for some of the world's most famous modernist buildings, including Brasilia's crown-shaped cathedral. He was 104.
NPR

Syrian Conflict May Be At A Turning Point

Are we seeing the endgame to the conflict in Syria? Melissa Block talks with Andrew Tabler, a senior fellow at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy and author of the book, In the Lion's Den: An Eyewitness Account of Washington's Battle with Syria. We ask Tabler about what the collapse of the Bashar Assad regime might look like and the possibility that government forces could use chemical weapons.
NPR

Israel, Christians Negotiate The Price Of Holy Water

High-level diplomacy helped avert a disaster last month, in a dispute over the unpaid water bill of one of Christendom's holiest sites. The water company that supplies the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem said it owed $2.3 million. Eventually, the bill was waived — but the church now promises to pay going forward.

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