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China's President-To-Be Mysteriously Absent

The man in line to be China's next President has missed a number of official functions recently — leading to speculation about his health. Xi Jinping who's expected to take over the presidency next month, has not been seen in public for the last ten days. Comments on Chinese microblogging sites suggested he might be severely ill, or had been injured in a car crash. However wire reports quoting unnamed official sources say Xi has injured his back while swimming, and is avoiding public events while he recovers.
NPR

What We Know About Iran's Nuclear Program

A report from the International Atomic Energy Agency shows that Iran has continued its efforts to enrich uranium. Ever-tightening sanctions appear to be putting a strain on the Iranian economy, but have done little to deter Iran's enrichment program.
NPR

The Mysterious Case Of China's Disappearing Heir Apparent

Xi Jinping, the next in line to succeed President Hu Jintao, has missed important meetings in the past week, with officials offering no explanation for his sudden disappearance.
NPR

China Sends Patrol Boats To Islands Disputed With Japan

Despite Beijing's claim of sovereignty over the islands, Japan has nationalized them as part of a deal to buy them from private Japanese owners.
NPR

Fears Of Currency Devaluation Mount In Egypt

Throughout the government's transitional period, the Egyptian pound remained stable because the government shored it up through foreign reserves. As those reserves reach dangerously low levels, concern is mounting that a major currency devaluation is imminent.
NPR

Army Aims To Use Words, Not Weapons, With Afghans

As the U.S. military steps up training of Afghan troops in preparation for the U.S. withdrawal in 2014, it has also ratcheted up its efforts to train U.S. soldiers in Afghan language and customs. This year, the Army has more than doubled the number of soldiers trained in Pashto and Dari.
NPR

Candidates Criticize China; Presidents Show Caution

For more than three decades, presidential candidates have talked tough about China during the campaign season. But in the Oval Office, presidents have generally been much less aggressive.

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