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The Sky Isn't Falling Over The Korean Peninsula — Yet

ANALYSIS: The threats are coming almost daily. But put what's being said by North Korean leaders in context, and remember, we've heard this before. Still, war on the Korean peninsula would be disastrous. So the talk can't be dismissed.
WAMU 88.5

Friday News Roundup - International

North Korean threats prompt the U.S. to boost missile defenses in the Pacific. Syria’s civil war claims a record 6,000 lives in March. And the U.N. adopts a global arms trade treaty. A panel of journalists joins guest host Susan Page for analysis of the week's top international news stories.

NPR

North Korea Moves Missile, Threatens To Close Factories Used By South

South Korea's defense minister says the missile could have been moved for testing or for drills, and that there's no sign of military mobilizations that could suggest preparations for a full-scale conflict.
NPR

South Africans: Why Were Paratroopers In Central African Republic?

The deaths of 13 South African soldiers in the mutinous Central African Republic has opposition politicians asking why South African troops were there. The ruling ANC has denied it has any business in the Central African Republic — which is rich in natural resources, including diamonds and uranium.
NPR

Risks Increase For Humanitarian Aid Workers In Syria

David Greene talks to Muhannad Hadi, the World Food Program's regional emergency coordinator for Syria, about the growing humanitarian crisis in Syria. The civil war there has entered its third year, and last month was its deadliest.
NPR

As Egypt Negotiates IMF Loan, Food And Fuel Prices Soar

Cairo is negotiating with the International Monetary Fund for a $4.8 billion loan to help pull Egypt out of its deep economic crisis. The government subsidizes wheat and fuel but is running out of money to purchase these crucial imports, and Egyptians are feeling the pinch.
NPR

A Political War Brews Over 'Food For Peace' Aid Program

Rumors abound of a major shakeup in the works for U.S. food aid programs. The U.S. would give aid groups money to buy food wherever they could get it cheapest and quickest, rather than shipping abroad commodities bought in the U.S. Already, groups that profit from the current system are mounting a fight.

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