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Afghan Farmers: Opium Is The Only Way To Make A Living

Opium poppy cultivation has hit a record level, according to a new U.N. report. Western countries have been trying to eradicate the poppies for years. Yet it remains the single largest economic sector in places like the southern province of Helmand.
NPR

Americans Might Soon Get To Buy Mexican Beachfront, Border Land

Mexico is considering relaxing its law prohibiting foreigners from owning land within 30 miles of the coast or about 60 miles from an international border. Real estate developers say the change would lead to a boom along Mexico's coasts. But opponents fear it could launch a modern-day foreign land grab.
NPR

UN Report Puts Afghan Opium Poppy Cultivation At Record High

A U.N. report on the Afghan poppy harvest shows a sharp increase in cultivation and says the production of opium could rise 50 percent. The Pentagon has already pointed to the increase and says the Taliban is involved in protecting the poppy fields and controlling the drug routes. Besides funding the Taliban, officials say the increased opium yield will only add to one of the most nagging problems in the country: government corruption.
NPR

Typhoon Victims Struggle To Survive As Aid Is Slow To Arrive

Military aircraft are flying supplies into the Philippines, but the goods haven't reached many of those who need them. As officials assess what's needed, food aid has been looted. Meanwhile, desperate crowds push up against the local airport's fences, hoping to get on a plane out of Tacloban.
NPR

The Challenges And Limitations Of Disaster Donations

After Typhoon Haiyan ripped through the Philippines, people around the world responded to calls for donations to help with the aftermath. But what are the limits and challenges of sending contributions and charitable donations to the storm victims? Audie Cornish speaks with Robert Ottenhoff, president of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, to find out.
NPR

Flooded And Powerless: When Lights And Cellphones Go Dark

When Typhoon Haiyan roiled a swath of the Philippines, it cut out power and telecommunications. Aid workers and service providers are gradually restoring the system. In the meantime, a patchwork of devices fill in the gaps.
NPR

Police: British Spy's Strange Death Was 'Probably An Accident'

Scotland Yard says it believes Gareth Williams, whose naked and decomposing body was found locked inside a gym bag in 2010, was not murdered.
NPR

Could Hunger Make Us More Charitable?

Hunger can make many people "hangry," or irritable. But new research suggests that we may have another, innate response to hunger: a desire to help others in need.
NPR

Christmas Lights Make Slippers In Global 'Junkyard' Economy

The Chinese town of Shijiao is known for recycling discarded Christmas tree lights for their copper and wire insulation, which are then used to support growing economies and make slipper soles, respectively. In Junkyard Planet, Adam Minter explores the business of recycling what developed nations throw away.
NPR

A Typhoon's Devastation By The Numbers

The dead are still being buried and the damages are still being calculated in one of the strongest typhoons ever. The death toll, previously estimated at 10,000, now looks to be much lower.

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