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NPR

Plan For Wind Turbines On Normandy Coast Spins Controversy

Thursday, on the 69th anniversary of the D-Day invasion, many have gathered on the coast of Normandy to remember and honor the Allied soldiers who fought their way through Nazi defenses and went on to liberate Europe. There is controversy about a French plan to build 75 wind turbines offshore here. Critics see it as desecration of hollowed ground. Promoters say the wind mills will be at least 6 miles from the coast. They will still be visible but will help France meet its renewable energy goals and create thousands of jobs.
NPR

The Changing Face, Perception Of Turkey's Prime Minister

Recep Tayyip Erdogan may be the most successful prime minister in modern Turkey's history. A deeply pious Muslim once jailed for his outspoken remarks, he has presided over a decade of democratic reforms and economic growth. But now he finds himself the target of angry protesters who call him a dictator and a fascist.
NPR

Coming Out As Black, When You Were Hispanic

Teen Elaine Vilorio spent years trying to make sense of her racial identity. She describes herself as Hispanic, but other people see her as black. Vilorio speaks to guest host Celeste Headlee about her recent HuffPost Teen blog, 'Coming Out As Black.'
WAMU 88.5

Shibley Telhami: "The World Through Arab Eyes" (Rebroadcast)

The Arab uprisings in the Middle East have profoundly altered politics in the region. Using a decade’s worth of original polling data, a political scientist explains the driving forces behind the Arab Spring and the future of Arab politics.

NPR

Looking Ahead To The Future Of Syria's Crisis

To date, the civil war in Syria has claimed tens of thousands of lives and, according U.N. estimates, has caused more than a million refugees to flee to neighboring countries. As part of TOTN's "Looking Ahead" series, NPR foreign correspondent Deb Amos discusses where the conflict may go.
NPR

In Turkey, Protesters Proudly Call Themselves 'Looters'

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan energized protesters when he called them "looters." The demonstrators have embraced the term, spreading it far and wide on social media.
NPR

Once Unsafe, Rio's Shantytowns See Rapid Gentrification

First came the day trips for foreigner tourists to the shantytowns. Now, young Westerners are living in formerly no-go areas — with yoga classes and sushi restaurants following. Business is booming in Rio de Janeiro's favelas, but some residents complain they're being priced out of the market.

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