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Bones Tell Tale Of Desperation Among The Starving At Jamestown

The winter of 1609-1610 has been called the "starving time" for the hundreds of men and women who settled the English colony of Jamestown, Va. They ate their horses, their pets — and, apparently, at least one person. Scientists say human bones recovered from the site provide the first hard evidence that the colonists may have resorted to cannibalism.
NPR

Once A Grand Occasion, May Day Loses Significance In Russia

May Day in Moscow used to attract thousands of people to celebrate International Workers Day. Although May Day may still be a holiday, it's much less of an occasion now.
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Look Into The Face Of Cannibalism In Colonial Jamestown

The remains of a 14-year-old girl from the colonial Jamestown colony shows evidence of cannibalism, in findings presented by Smithsonian.

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Eternal Flame At Arlington National Cemetery Undergoes Repairs

The eternal flame at President John F. Kennedy's gravesite in the Arlington National Cemetery is undergoing repairs for the month of May.

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At Holocaust Museum, Clinton And Wiesel Urge Young To Remember

On the museum's 20th anniversary, a Nobel laureate and a former president say coming generations must preserve the Holocaust's awful history. We all needed to be reminded, Clinton said, that "no matter how smart a people are, if you have a head without a heart, you are not human."
NPR

First He Invented The Phone. Then, Bell Left A Voice Message.

We finally know what the inventor of the telephone sounded like. Last week, the Smithsonian unveiled recordings of Alexander Graham Bell's voice from 1885. It's the first known recording of him speaking.
NPR

Through Art And Industry, Chicago Shaped America

Blues, jazz and gospel; a civil rights movement that began with the Emmett Till case; modern glass and steel buildings that dared the sky. In Third Coast, Thomas Dyja writes that "the most profound aspects of American Modernity grew up out of the flat, prairie land next to Lake Michigan."
NPR

30 Years On, Educators Still Divided On Scathing Schools Report

On April 26, 1983, a panel appointed by President Ronald Reagan released an ominous report that painted a dire picture of the U.S. education system. Thirty years later, many educators point to the report as the catalyst for divides that still split education reformers.

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