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Another America: Liberia's Story

In 1840, a group of about 80 African-Americans set sail for the west coast of Africa to establish a new nation based on ideals gleaned from the American experiment. We explore Liberia's unique history.

NPR

What's Making Headlines Outside Of Washington?

Congress has gone home for its annual August recess, so Tell Me More takes a look at headlines in places across the country. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Mike Leary from the San Antonio Express-News and Dana Coffield of The Denver Post.
NPR

Why Do Sikhs Want To Serve In The Military?

Sikhs have a long history of fighting in wars. But in the US, their turbans and beards often prevent them from being able to join the military. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with Major Kamaljit Kalsi who's hoping to change that.
NPR

Could Prison Spell The End Of The Jackson Dynasty?

Former congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. was sentenced to prison for illegal use of campaign funds. Is this the end of the Jackson legacy or could he make a comeback? The Barbershop guys weigh in.
NPR

Bayard Rustin: The Man Who Organized The March On Washington

The strategist behind the 1963 march will posthumously receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom this year. As a gay man, his position in the movement was questioned. But now he is considered "an amazing role model" for activists of color who are also gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender.
NPR

Island Reads: Finding Out Ancestors Were Slave Owners

Andrea Stuart found that one of her ancestors owned some of her other relatives. She tells their unheard story in the book Sugar in the Blood. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Stuart about her family history, the moral complexity of slavery and finding roots in the past.
NPR

Past Immigration Policies Had A Reverse Effect, Professor Says

Princeton sociology professor Douglas Massey tells guest host Celeste Headlee that many of the policies intended to stop undocumented immigration not only failed, but actually kept migrants from returning to their home countries.
NPR

African-American Musicians, More Than Just Jazz

Jazz may be the first thing that comes to mind when we think of the contributions African-Americans have made to music. But the Gateways Musical Festival highlights African-Americans' classical past. Guest host Celeste Headlee finds out more.
NPR

A Postman's 1963 Walk For Justice, Cut Short On An Alabama Road

Before the nation's attention turned to the March on Washington, William Moore was making his own pilgrimage for racial equality. He intended to walk from Tennessee to Jackson, Miss., to ask the Mississippi governor to end segregation — but the Baltimore mail carrier never reached his destination.
NPR

Determined To Reach 1963 March, Teen Used Thumb And Feet

In August 1963, Robert Avery of Gadsden, Ala., was 15 and active in the civil rights movement. He and two friends were bent on participating in the March on Washington, but with little money, they had no choice but to hitchhike — on Southern roads that could be dangerous for segregation opponents.

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