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John Muller: "Mark Twain In Washington, D.C."

Young Mark Twain, on the cusp of fame as an author, worked as a D.C. journalist for some months in 1867 and 1868. We find out how his short time in the city shaped his career and trademark satirical style, and discover shadows of Twain's D.C. in the modern District.

NPR

American Indian Leader Encouraged By White House Meeting

Native American leaders from across the country gathered at the White House recently for the fifth annual tribal summit. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with Brian Cladoosby, the newly elected president of the National Congress of American Indians, about the top issues in Indian country.
NPR

Author Anton Treuer On Native American Tunes

Anton Treuer is the author of the book Everything You Wanted To Know About Indians But Were Afraid To Ask. During this Native American Heritage Month, he recommends some tunes for Tell Me More's 'In Your Ear' series.
WAMU 88.5

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

President Barack Obama meets with insurance executives on fixing cancelled policies. Senate Republicans block the president's third judicial nominee in three weeks. And America marks the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's assassination. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top national news stories.

NPR

Mexican-American Vets Ignited Kennedy's Latino Support

Most politicians recognize the importance of the Latino vote, but John F. Kennedy might have been the first presidential candidate to actively court it. Viva Kennedy clubs started by former Mexican-American veterans were an important factor in Kennedy's 1960 victory.
NPR

JFK And Civil Rights: It's Complicated

President John F. Kennedy's relationship with civil rights was far from simple. Host Michel Martin speaks with one of the last living leaders of the civil rights movement, Georgia Representative John Lewis, about his own relationship with President Kennedy. Stanford historian Clayborne Carson also joins the conversation.
NPR

Soul Food For Thanksgiving: Mac And Cheese, 'Red Drink,' And More

Chitlins, black-eyed peas and sweet potato greens ... it's all soul food you might want to consider adding to your Thanksgiving table. Host Michel Martin hears about the history of soul food — and gets some recipes — from Adrian Miller, author of Soul Food: The Surprising Story of An American Cuisine One Plate At A Time.
NPR

Short Speech Still Resonates: The Gettysburg Address Turns 150

Tuesday marks the 150th Anniversary of the Gettysburg address. President Abraham Lincoln delivered these 278 words at the Dedication of the Cemetery at Gettysburg. Melissa Block talks with Civil War historian Harold Holzer about the address.
NPR

'Coolie Woman' Rescues Indentured Women From Anonymity

When slavery was outlawed in the Caribbean, indentured servitude took over. Host Michel Martin speaks with author Gauitra Bahadur. Her book Coolie Woman traces her great-grandmother's roots from India to Guyana.
NPR

Dominican Republic Official Defends Citizenship Ruling

The Dominican Republic is questioning the citizenship of thousands of Haitians who moved there in the 1930s and their children. Host Michel Martin talks with Leonel Mateo, from the Dominican embassy in Washington D.C., about the controversial ruling.

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