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The 'Delta Collection': Sneaking A Peek At The Library Of Congress' Erotica Stash

The Library of Congress holds a vast collection of reference materials and books — including plenty of erotica and pornography.

NPR

Remembering How The Great War Changed U.S. Sports

This summer marks the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I. Commentator Frank Deford considers the war's unlikely impact on American sports.
NPR

The Grandes Dames Of The Sea Ply The Tuscan Waters

A most unusual regatta recently celebrated vintage yachts, some more than 100 years old, and a time when sailing the oceans depended on well-trained crews with little more than compass and sextant.
NPR

Relics Of The Patron Saint Of Immigrants Take A Pilgrimage

This month, Saint Toribio Romo's relics will be displayed in churches around California. His spirit is said to guide, feed and shelter immigrants as they journey across the U.S.-Mexico border.
WAMU 88.5

Remembering The Maryland Roots Of An American Gospel Legend

Rev. Charles Albert Tindley is considered one of the founding fathers of American Gospel Music, and at least one historian in Berlin, Maryland, would like to hear more about his Maryland roots.

NPR

Historians Mine 400 Years Of Crime Data At The Old Bailey

Analyzing records from London's oldest criminal court reveals how Western society has viewed violent crime over time. Science writer Jennifer Ouellette discusses the findings with NPR's Arun Rath.
NPR

Founders Claimed A Subversive Right To 'Nature's God'

The U.S. was not founded as a Christian nation, says historian Matthew Stewart. He tells NPR's Arun Rath about his book Nature's God: The Heretical Origins of the American Republic.
NPR

D.C. Fort Was The Site Of Lincoln's Close Call

The Battle of Fort Stevens took place 150 years ago in Washington, D.C. It's mostly forgotten now, but it was a crucial battle for the Union, and President Lincoln was almost killed by enemy fire.
WAMU 88.5

Washington's Civil War Sesquicentennial

A free black woman gave up land she owned to build Fort Stevens, where D.C.'s only Civil War skirmish took place 150 years ago this week. We explore the battle President Lincoln came to watch.

WAMU 88.5

Civil War Reenactment To Commemorate 150th Anniversary Of D.C.'s Ft. Stevens

Fort Stevens is the only Civil War-era fort within the District to have seen battle, and this weekend historians, residents and Civil War buffs will be observing the 150th anniversary of the battle that could have spelled disaster for the nation's capital.

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