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NPR

Lost King UCLA Speech Found In Basement Archive

Tapes of Martin Luther King Jr.'s remarks at UCLA in April of 1965 were recently discovered, and offer an insight into how his words still resonate today.
NPR

From Wax Cylinders To Records, Saving The Sounds Of History

Many of the items in The British Library's vast collection of recorded sound are in danger of disappearing. Some just physically won't last much longer; others are stored in long-dead formats.
NPR

Broken Promises On Display At Native American Treaties Exhibit

A rare exhibit at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian explores the history of treaties between Native American nations and the U.S.
NPR

King's Family Builds Its Own Legacy Of Legal Battles

Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s children have feuded bitterly over his legacy for years. They're often criticized, but some believe their desire to tightly control their father's estate is fair.
NPR

'Train to Crystal City' Tells A Secret Story Of WWII Internments

A World War II program traded German and Italian Americans for Americans who were trapped abroad. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with author Jan Jarboe Russell.
NPR

Illustrated Memoir Recalls Marching In Selma At Just 15

Lynda Blackmon Lowery was still a child when she joined the legendary 1965 march. Now she's written a book for young readers about the experience, called Turning 15 On The Road To Freedom.
NPR

Do You Harp A Slib Of The Ling? One Small Town's Opaque Language

Tiny Boonville, Calif., is known for a few things. Its wineries, its tight-knit community, and its very own language. Boontling was created in the late 1800s as a way to gossip covertly.
NPR

Hawaii As 'Racial Paradise'? Bid For Obama Library Invokes A Complex Past

Professor Ellen Wu writes about how the mythology — and the history — of Hawaii as a multicultural melting pot may affect its chances of hosting the Obama Presidential Library.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia House Of Delegates Breaks Out Ceremonial Mace

The Virginia House of Delegates gaveled into session Wednesday, offering an opportunity for the state's ceremonial mace to get some time to shine.

NPR

Far From North Africa, Berbers In The U.S. Ring In A New Year

For the indigenous people of Northern Africa, Jan. 14 is a day to celebrate their culture and religion. It reminds Berbers living in the U.S. of the struggle to preserve their identity far from home.

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