History | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

History

RSS Feed
NPR

How 'Sassy' Came To Mean Something Both Sweet And Sour

Since the new Lifetime show Girlfriend Intervention has resurrected the tired old cliche of the "sassy black woman," one black woman decided "sassy" needed some scrutiny.
NPR

London Evacuees Bore A Painful Cost Of War

NPR's Scott Simon talks with Pam Hobbs about the 75th anniversary of Operation Pied Piper. She was one of the children who were evacuated from London during World War II.
NPR

When A Mayor Moved To The Cabrini-Green Projects

Chicago's Circle Interchange highway loop was renamed after Jane Byrne this week, the city's first and only female mayor. Scott Simon talks with Kathy Byrne about her mother's legacy.
WAMU 88.5

Recording the Capital: A Musical History of D.C. (Rebroadcast)

The musical history of the Washington area goes deeper than Duke Ellington and Chuck Brown. But much of the music recorded here in the 20th century, from early rock and roll to bluegrass to jazz, was forgotten about long ago. Kojo chats with Jay Bruder, the host of "The Hometown Special" on WAMU's Bluegrass Country, about the recorded musical history of the nation's capital.

NPR

How A Colonial-Era Error Put The Carolinas At Odds

Robert Siegel speaks with Stephen R. Kelly, a visiting professor at Duke University, about how North and South Carolina hope to resolve questions about the border between them. The original border, which was mandated by the British during the colonial era, was never surveyed properly. That's caused headaches ever since the 18th century.
NPR

Freedom Strategy Put To The Test At Democratic National Convention

Fifty years ago, Fannie Lou Hamer, a plantation worker turned civil rights activist, disrupted the Democratic National Convention to get delegates from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party seated.
WAMU 88.5

Star-Spangled Banner Replica Connects Past With Present

The Maryland Historical Society displayed a replica of the star-spangled banner on Sunday — the same which famously inspired Francis Scott Key to pen the national anthem.

NPR

Bob Motley, Last Surviving Negro League Ump, Recalls Baseball History

The 91-year-old former Marine went from borrowing a mask at an Okinawa hospital to umpiring in the Negro League, where he made calls against legends like Satchel Paige, Hank Aaron and Willie Mays.
NPR

Picking Sides At Day Camp: Confederacy Or Union?

At typical summer day camps, kids swim, do arts and crafts and face off on the soccer field. But at a one-day program in North Carolina, 8- to 12-year-olds take sides in the Civil War.
NPR

50 Years Before Ferguson, A Summer Of Riots Racked The U.S.

In the summer of 1964, violent demonstrations spread across seven cities, each sparked by confrontations between black residents and their predominantly white police forces.

Pages