History

RSS Feed
NPR

Slocum Massacre Highlights Historical Double Standard In The South

On Saturday in Slocum, Texas, the state will officially recognize the Slocum Massacre of 1910 — the attack on a black community in east Texas by white residents. The recognition comes over the objections of the white county officials.
NPR

Norway's National Library Discovers Rare Atlas — With A Little Help From Reddit

The Cedid was one of the first printed atlases from the Muslim world. There were 14 known copies in existence — until a Norwegian reference librarian with a fondness for /r/MapPorn noticed something.
NPR

The Accidental Wheelman Of Martin Luther King Jr.

In the mid-'60s, Tom Houck left high school to join the civil rights movement. But he never expected he'd become the personal driver to the movement's leader — mostly because he had a license.
NPR

Long After Armenian Genocide, Retracing A Grandfather's Steps To Survival

For The Hundred-Year Walk, author Dawn Anahid MacKeen visited the sites of her grandfather's escape. Like him, she says she found a haven in Raqqa, Syria, a city currently controlled by ISIS.
NPR

Herman Wouk Says He's A 'Happy Gent' At 100

The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of beloved blockbusters like The Winds of War is celebrating his milestone with a new memoir, Sailor and Fiddler, that sums up his thoughts on what it means to write.
NPR

The Failed Coup That Led To Hitler's 'Mein Kampf'

Adolf Hitler wrote his famous manifesto while serving time for an attempted coup that started in a German beer hall. Author Peter Ross Range says, "There was an obvious need to get his message out."
WAMU 88.5

The Bizarre But True Story Of Abductions By North Korea

In the 1970s people began vanishing from Japan's coastal towns. Years later their families learned they had been abducted by North Korea. Only five ever returned home. The bizarre but true story of the abduction project, and insights into the secretive nation today.

NPR

Super Bowl Commercial Inspires Maraniss To Write About Detroit's Better Times

David Greene talks to journalist David Maraniss about a key moment when Detroit seemed to rule the world. Maraniss has written a history of Detroit's commerce and culture called Once in a Great City.
NPR

Illustrating Diet Advice Is Hard. Here's How USDA Has Tried To Do It

The USDA has been doling out nutrition advice since 1894. As the science changed, so did the government's efforts to visualize its best advice – sometimes, with amusing results to our modern eyes.
WAMU 88.5

Analysis Of President Obama's Final State of the Union Address

Political reporters weigh in on President Obama's last State of the Union speech. We discuss Obama's final-year agenda, including efforts to reform gun laws and address voter fears over terrorism and the economy.

Pages