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The History Of The Nobel Prizes

Ahead of the Nobel Prizes being awarded this week, curator of the Nobel Museum Gustav Källstrand talks about the history of the prizes and how winners are chosen.

For Sale: A Texan Symbol Of Defiance

The "come and take it" flag, born of revolution, is a hallmark of Texas pride. But locals are angry that the motto has been co-opted by Second Amendment rights groups and T-shirt sellers.

When Presidents' Words Are Amplified, Scrutinized And Become '-Isms'

Putting your foot in your mouth isn't just a political hazard, it can be an occupation. Esquire Editor at Large AJ Jacobs looks at the gaffes of the great and the good.

This Historian Wants You To Know The Real Story Of Southern Food

Michael Twitty wants credit given to the enslaved African-Americans who were part of Southern cuisine's creation. So he goes to places like Monticello to cook meals slaves would have eaten.

For Rosh Hashana, A Matzo Ball Soup By Way Of Mexico

Matzo ball soup is a classic straight from Eastern Europe. But not all Jews from the region came to the New World via Ellis Island, as this jalapeño-inflected recipe reflects.

The Sweet Success Of Bananas Foster Has An Unsavory Past

One of New Orleans' favorite desserts is a lasting legacy of an oft-forgotten chapter in the city's history: the banana trade, and its infamous practices.

Meet Some Of The Voices From 'Working' Then And Now

Taped interviews that Studs Terkel used for his book Working had been packed in boxes for decades. Here are some of those recordings, as part of a new series produced by Radio Diaries and Project&.

CBS Prepares To Sell Historic Radio Division

NPR's Robert Siegel talks to radio historian Frank Absher about the heyday of CBS Radio, which is now up for sale. CBS was one of the first networks to truly realize the power of news and develop its use.
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Colson Whitehead On The Importance Of Historical Fiction In Tumultuous Times

Kojo talks with author Colson Whitehead about his new novel "The Underground Railroad" and its resonance at this particular moment in history.


When Mrs. Eisele Took Manhattan: Big City Failed To Awe Minnesota Journalist

In 1936, Country Home magazine sent its "rural correspondent of the year" Susan Eisele on a trip to NYC. With a 6-week-old in tow, she soaked up the city and hit it off with hard-bitten newspapermen.