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NPR

Oakland Raiders' Al Davis 'True Legend' Of The Game

Longtime Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis, whose maverick style had a huge impact on professional football, has died. The 82-year-old saw his team win three Super Bowls. His independent streak was both admired and excoriated, but stubbornness in his later years was blamed for the team's struggles. NPR's Allison Keyes has this remembrance.
NPR

Germany Reopens Nazi War Criminal Investigations

In 1977, the family of retired autoworker John Demjanjuk was astounded when he was accused of having been a guard known as "Ivan the Terrible" at a Nazi death camp in World War II. His case was considered the last of the Nazi war crimes trials, but this week, prosecutors in Germany said they were reopening hundreds of investigations. Host Audie Cornish talks with historian Deborah Lipstadt about how that might play out.
NPR

Ex-Employee Put National Archives On eBay

A former longtime employee of the National Archives pleaded guilty this week to stealing almost a thousand audio recordings belonging to the federal government. The stolen goods range from radio episodes of Dragnet and Gunsmoke to a 1937 recording of Babe Ruth hunting. Host Audie Cornish has the story.
NPR

'Turquoise Palace' A True Political Murder Mystery

On Sept. 17, 1992, a group of Iranian and Kurdish opposition leaders were assassinated in a Greek restaurant in Berlin. Despite pressures to keep the investigation at the lowest possible level, a German prosecutor unraveled a tangle of threads that led to Iran's Supreme Leader himself. Host Scott Simon speaks with Roya Hakakian, author of the new book, Assassins of the Turquoise Palace.
NPR

A Look At The History Of Wall Street Protests

Guy Raz talks to Beverly Gage, associate professor of history at Yale University and author of the book The Day Wall Street Exploded: The Story of America in its First Age of Terror, about the history of protests on Wall Street.
NPR

Is Human Violence On The Wane?

Considering the Norway shootings, drug wars in Mexico and ongoing conflicts in the Middle East, this era may seem as violent as any. But as Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker argues in his book The Better Angels of Our Nature, this may actually be the most peaceable period in human history.
NPR

One Term, Or Two? Obama Faces Season Of Doubt

There is in the American air — some 13 months away from the 2012 election — a whiff of suggestion that Obama might not be re-elected. Or re-electable. Past presidents have weathered stormier times, but when you hit bottom matters.
NPR

First White House TV Address Delivered 64 Years Ago

Melissa Block and Guy Raz tell us about this day in history 64 years ago when then-President Harry S Truman gave the nation's first televised address from the White House.
NPR

These Days, Everyone Dares Call It Treason

Treason is the only crime defined in the U.S. Constitution and is considered by many to be the worst of all crimes against society. So when one politician accuses another of treason, that should be a serious charge, right? Not so much, as it turns out.

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