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NPR

Film Sheds Light On Hate Crimes, Sparks Action

In 2008, seven white teens killed an Ecuadorean immigrant who had lived in Patchogue, N.Y., for 13 years. The tragedy revealed a pattern of violence against Latinos in that town. The documentary Not In Our Town: Light in the Darkness chronicles the community's grief and outrage.
NPR

America's 2nd Largest Indian Tribe Expels Blacks

The Cherokee Nation recently stripped citizenship from a majority of African-Americans who descended from slaves of wealthy Cherokee Indians before the Civil War. Host Michel Martin discusses this controversial move with MacArthur Fellow Tiya Miles, who studies interrelated histories of African-Americans and Native Americans.
NPR

The Beatles: Fab Four AND Civil Rights Activists

An old Beatles performance contract set to be auctioned gives some new insight into the values of the Fab Four early in their career. The document is for a 1965 concert and states that the group "not be required to perform in front of a segregated audience." Host Audie Cornish has more.
NPR

Obama's Re-Election: What Are The Odds?

With unemployment at 9.1 percent and the economy as the top issue of the 2012 presidential race, the president faces a tough fight for re-election. Still, he might find some encouragement in the history books. Host Audie Cornish chats with presidential historian Michael Beschloss about Obama's odds for re-election.
WAMU 88.5

Va. Historical Society Unveils Slave Name Database

A database containing 1,500 Va. slave names was unveiled Thursday, giving scholars and family historians a new resource for examining histories within families and the state of Virginia.

NPR

Memories Of Grandma Silvia, And Slavery's Legacy

When she was 16, Ellaraino visited her great-grandmother, Silvia, for the first time. And Silvia had plenty of stories to tell. They were about being a teenager — and seeing the Civil War, and slavery, come to an end.
WAMU 88.5

Smaller Crowd Expected At MLK Dedication

MLK Memorial

After the dedication of the new Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in D.C. was cancelled last month during Hurricane Irene, organizers are now expecting a much smaller crowd at the rescheduled event. 

NPR

The NCAA And Its Treatment Of Student Athletes

The NCAA was created in 1906, at the behest of President Theodore Roosevelt, to protect and look out for the best interests of student athletes. In the latest issue of The Atlantic magazine, journalist Taylor Branch tracks how the organization evolved over the years into a body that now, he says, exploits young athletes for the financial gain of its member schools. Melissa Block talks to Branch about his article, which advocates for better treatment — and pay — for student athletes.
NPR

The Economic Catastrophe That Germany Can't Forget

To understand why Germany is so freaked out by what Europe's central bank is doing, you need to go back nearly a century.
WAMU 88.5

Md. Seeks Harriet Tubman National Park

harriet tubman visitors center

Maryland senator Ben Cardin is sponsoring a bill that would create two national parks dedicated to Harriet Tubman and her fight against slavery.

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