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Finders Not Keepers: Yale Returns Artifacts To Peru

Objects excavated from the Machu Picchu ruins in the early 1900s have finally come home. The artifacts were taken by Yale explorer Hiram Bingham III. After 100 years, an international custody battle and an angry letter from Yale alumni, they're are back on display in their country of origin.
NPR

Science Diction: The Origin Of The Petri Dish

In 1887, Julius Petri invented a simple pair of nesting glass dishes, ideal for keeping specimens of growing bacteria sterile--the 'Petri dish.' Science historian Howard Markel recounts the history of this ubiquitous lab supply, and the serendipitous discovery of the stuff in it, agar.
WAMU 88.5

Rediscovering The Piscataway Hub Of Moyaone

Piscataway Park in Accokeek, Md. is sacred land to local Native Americans, but few Washingtonians know the significance of this symbolic spot on the Potomac River.
NPR

Oldest Black Church Open After Six-Year Restoration

The nation's oldest black church reopens to the public this week after a $9-million restoration fueled in part by federal stimulus funds, and completed in painstaking detail despite the recession. Shannon Mullen tours Boston's African Meeting House with the woman who led the project.
NPR

This Time, Germany's Rise Doesn't Worry The French

Opposition politicians and press pundits in France warn that the Sarkozy-Merkel plan to save the Euro will make France subservient to Germany. They say France will lose its sovereignty by giving a German-dominated EU control over French fiscal policy. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley pounded the pavement of Paris for days, however, and could not find a single rank-and-file French citizen who shared these fears.
NPR

Heisman's First Winner Said No To The Pros

In 1936, when the Ivy League dominated football, Yale end Larry Kelley was the first college football player to win the Heisman Trophy. But instead of going pro, Kelley returned to his old high school to teach history and coach.
NPR

Herzog's Doc Brings Prehistoric Paintings To Life

German filmmaker Werner Herzog was one of the few people permitted to enter a cave in France containing the oldest recorded cave paintings. What he saw — and what he imagined — is the subject of his documentary, The Cave of Forgotten Dreams.
NPR

A Survivor's Duty After Pearl Harbor: Telling The Story

Frank Curre admitted to being haunted by the Pearl Harbor raid, saying it gave him nightmares. But he also saw every day after Dec. 7, 1941, as a gift. And as a survivor, he saw it as his duty to tell the story of what he saw that day.
NPR

Black Scholar Of The Civil War Asks: Who's With Me?

The Civil War ended slavery in America. So why, asks author Ta-Nehisi Coates, do African-Americans, who benefited most from this crucial turning point, take so little interest in the conflict? Coates, a confessed Civil War obsessive, wrote an essay for The Atlantic titled "Why Do So Few Blacks Study the Civil War?"

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