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One Term, Or Two? Obama Faces Season Of Doubt

There is in the American air — some 13 months away from the 2012 election — a whiff of suggestion that Obama might not be re-elected. Or re-electable. Past presidents have weathered stormier times, but when you hit bottom matters.
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First White House TV Address Delivered 64 Years Ago

Melissa Block and Guy Raz tell us about this day in history 64 years ago when then-President Harry S Truman gave the nation's first televised address from the White House.
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These Days, Everyone Dares Call It Treason

Treason is the only crime defined in the U.S. Constitution and is considered by many to be the worst of all crimes against society. So when one politician accuses another of treason, that should be a serious charge, right? Not so much, as it turns out.
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Beethoven's Lost Work No Longer Imaginary

In 1800 Ludwig van Beethoven dumped and re-wrote the whole second movement of his String Quartet in G, Opus 18, No. 2. Most scholars thought the original draft was lost, but a music professor from the University of Manchester has reconstructed what he thinks that first version might have sounded like. Host Audie Cornish talks with violinist Vlad Bogdanas of the Quatuor Danel string quartet, which debuted the piece last week.
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Science Diction: The Origin Of The Word 'Epilepsy'

Humans have long suffered from epilepsy, the neurological disorder hallmarked by sudden seizures. Medical historian Howard Markel discusses the condition's names through the millenia, from the "sacred disease" of ancient texts to its description as "the falling sickness" in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar.
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Wanna Live Forever? Become A Noun

Joseph Guillotin, Henry Shrapnel and Jules Leotard became immortal — by entering the English language. But when your entire life is reduced to a single definition, the results are sometimes upsetting.
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Bill O'Reilly: 'Abraham Lincoln Was Our Best Leader'

In Killing Lincoln, Fox News host Bill O'Reilly and co-author Martin Dugard explore the life, death and legacy of America's 16th president. "I think Abraham Lincoln would be proud of his country today," O'Reilly says.
NPR

'Heart And Soul': An African-American History

Illustrator and author Kadir Nelson tells the African-American story — from Colonial times through the civil rights movement — in his new children's book, Heart and Soul.
NPR

Solving The Riddle Of The Grand Canyon's Formation

The Grand Canyon may seem to be a simple case of "river carves rock," but to geologists, its formation is still puzzling. Ira Flatow and guests discuss the canyon's mysteries, and the scientific sleuthing being done to solve them--millions of years after the Colorado River carried off the evidence.

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