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In Anacostia, 'Ring Shouters' Break World Record

The Smithsonian's Anacostia Community Museum recently put together the first national exhibit on Gullah culture: the descendants of African slaves who live in the low country region of South Carolina and Georgia. To mark the end of that exhibit's stay in D.C., the museum invited Gullah leaders from across the country to participate in a tradition known as a ring shout.

WAMU 88.5

Tuskegee Airmen Watch Plane's Final Flight

A piece of American history is about to fly into the Smithsonian, after its last flight over the Potomac River yesterday.

WAMU 88.5

Tuskegee Airmen's Plane Takes Final Flight

Nearly 100 surviving veterans of the Tuskegee Air Corps gathered in Washington to mark their 70th anniversary. The reunion coincides with the donation of an important piece of their history to the Smithsonian museum.

WAMU 88.5

Former Slave Pen Becomes Home For Seniors

Low-income seniors now have a new place to live in Alexandria: an affordable housing complex opened by a historically African-American church and located on a block that was once a slave pen.

NPR

Architect Of MLK Memorial Responds To Criticism

Melissa Block talks to Ed Jackson, Jr., the executive architect of the Martin Luther King memorial. They discuss the Martin Luther King "Drum Major" line that is etched on the north face of the monument. The line, taken from a February 1968 speech by King, was paraphrased. And one of the monument's high-profile consultants, poet Maya Angelou, told the Washington Post the inscription is misleading and makes the civil rights leader seem arrogant.
NPR

Researchers Recover Last Piece Of Ship At 9/11 Site

Last summer, the remains of what seemed to be an 18th century ship were found at the construction site of the World Trade Center. Earlier this month, archaeologists excavated the last piece of that ship. Robert Siegel speaks with Michael Pappalardo, who's been working at the site as an archeologist with the firm AKRF.
NPR

Race, Violence ... Justice? Looking Back At Jena 6

In August 2006, a black student in Jena, La. asked if he could sit under a tree on campus or if it was reserved for whites. Three nooses hung from the tree the next day. In December, six black boys brutally beat a white student, and five of the suspects were charged with attempted murder. Black talk radio hosts and civil rights leaders nationwide protested the charges. Have the demonstrations helped move the U.S. closer to racial justice? Host Michel Martin speaks with Stanford Law School Professor Richard Ford and radio talk host Warren Ballentine.
NPR

Stetson Kennedy, Who 'Unmasked' The Klan, Dies

Stetson Kennedy infiltrated the Ku Klux Klan in the 1940s and wrote about it in his book The Klan Unmasked. Guest host John Ydstie remembers the folklorist, who died Saturday at the age of 94.

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