History

RSS Feed
NPR

Determined To Reach 1963 March, Teen Used Thumb And Feet

In August 1963, Robert Avery of Gadsden, Ala., was 15 and active in the civil rights movement. He and two friends were bent on participating in the March on Washington, but with little money, they had no choice but to hitchhike — on Southern roads that could be dangerous for segregation opponents.
WAMU 88.5

A Second National Mall: The East Capitol Street That Might Have Been

The future of development along East Capitol Street is in flux, and not for the first time. Plans drafted before the advent of the second World War would have created a very different Capitol Hill neighborhood.

NPR

Stop-And-Frisk: 'I Remember Feeling Helpless'

Nicholas Peart was a plaintiff in a New York City stop-and-frisk lawsuit. He spoke with the StoryCorps project about being stopped and frisked by the police, while he was out celebrating his 18th birthday.
NPR

Medgar Evers' Son Honors Civil Rights Icon In His Own Way

James Van Dyke Evers was only 3 when his father, civil rights leader Medgar Evers, was shot and killed in the family's driveway. Van Evers chose not to follow in his father's footsteps — at what cost?
NPR

Three Ways Cooking Has Changed Over The Last 300 Years

When you put a librarian and a historian in the kitchen with a centuries' old cookbook, you get a lot more than recipes. You also get a sense of how much the way we eat has changed — from how we define dessert to the size of our eggs.
NPR

New Discovery Shows Spanish Imprint In U.S.

When people think of U.S. history, they often jump to the pilgrims at Plymouth Rock. But a new archaeological discovery shows just how far inland Spanish explorers traveled, decades before the English arrived. Kenneth C. Davis talks about some of the hidden Spanish history in the U.S.
NPR

Killed For Taking Part In 'Everybody's Fight'

Sally Liuzzo-Prado was just 6 when her mother, Viola Liuzzo, was killed by Ku Klux Klansmen following marches in Alabama. The death of Liuzzo, the only white woman protester to die during the civil rights movement, captured the nation.
NPR

Haunting Images Chronicle 165 Years Of A World At War

Images from conflicts in 28 countries are now on view at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. "The more you've seen of death and inhumanity, the more it turns you into someone who really can't stand the sight of war," says photojournalist David Burnett.
NPR

Amusement Parks And Jim Crow: MLK's Son Remembers

Most Americans think of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as a brilliant young minister who was one of the architects of the civil rights movement, and who was martyred for it in 1968. But to the revered leader's eldest son, Martin Luther King III, the famous man was just "Daddy."
NPR

America, Are You Tough Enough To Drink Real Russian Kvas?

Russians have been drinking kvas, a barely alcoholic fermented grain drink, for centuries. But the version sold commercially in the U.S.? It's largely just a wimpy, watered-down, sugary version, say aficionados. Now some new kvas makers are hoping Americans will embrace traditional, hard-core versions of the drink and its tangy, sour goodness.

Pages