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'Turquoise Palace' A True Political Murder Mystery

On Sept. 17, 1992, a group of Iranian and Kurdish opposition leaders were assassinated in a Greek restaurant in Berlin. Despite pressures to keep the investigation at the lowest possible level, a German prosecutor unraveled a tangle of threads that led to Iran's Supreme Leader himself. Host Scott Simon speaks with Roya Hakakian, author of the new book, Assassins of the Turquoise Palace.
NPR

A Look At The History Of Wall Street Protests

Guy Raz talks to Beverly Gage, associate professor of history at Yale University and author of the book The Day Wall Street Exploded: The Story of America in its First Age of Terror, about the history of protests on Wall Street.
NPR

Is Human Violence On The Wane?

Considering the Norway shootings, drug wars in Mexico and ongoing conflicts in the Middle East, this era may seem as violent as any. But as Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker argues in his book The Better Angels of Our Nature, this may actually be the most peaceable period in human history.
NPR

One Term, Or Two? Obama Faces Season Of Doubt

There is in the American air — some 13 months away from the 2012 election — a whiff of suggestion that Obama might not be re-elected. Or re-electable. Past presidents have weathered stormier times, but when you hit bottom matters.
NPR

First White House TV Address Delivered 64 Years Ago

Melissa Block and Guy Raz tell us about this day in history 64 years ago when then-President Harry S Truman gave the nation's first televised address from the White House.
NPR

These Days, Everyone Dares Call It Treason

Treason is the only crime defined in the U.S. Constitution and is considered by many to be the worst of all crimes against society. So when one politician accuses another of treason, that should be a serious charge, right? Not so much, as it turns out.
NPR

Beethoven's Lost Work No Longer Imaginary

In 1800 Ludwig van Beethoven dumped and re-wrote the whole second movement of his String Quartet in G, Opus 18, No. 2. Most scholars thought the original draft was lost, but a music professor from the University of Manchester has reconstructed what he thinks that first version might have sounded like. Host Audie Cornish talks with violinist Vlad Bogdanas of the Quatuor Danel string quartet, which debuted the piece last week.
NPR

Science Diction: The Origin Of The Word 'Epilepsy'

Humans have long suffered from epilepsy, the neurological disorder hallmarked by sudden seizures. Medical historian Howard Markel discusses the condition's names through the millenia, from the "sacred disease" of ancient texts to its description as "the falling sickness" in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar.

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