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Herzog's Doc Brings Prehistoric Paintings To Life

German filmmaker Werner Herzog was one of the few people permitted to enter a cave in France containing the oldest recorded cave paintings. What he saw — and what he imagined — is the subject of his documentary, The Cave of Forgotten Dreams.
NPR

A Survivor's Duty After Pearl Harbor: Telling The Story

Frank Curre admitted to being haunted by the Pearl Harbor raid, saying it gave him nightmares. But he also saw every day after Dec. 7, 1941, as a gift. And as a survivor, he saw it as his duty to tell the story of what he saw that day.
NPR

Black Scholar Of The Civil War Asks: Who's With Me?

The Civil War ended slavery in America. So why, asks author Ta-Nehisi Coates, do African-Americans, who benefited most from this crucial turning point, take so little interest in the conflict? Coates, a confessed Civil War obsessive, wrote an essay for The Atlantic titled "Why Do So Few Blacks Study the Civil War?"
NPR

Veteran Of Pearl Harbor Dies On Anniversary Of Attack

Frank Curre, a Navy veteran who survived the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, has died at the age of 88. According to his family, Curre died around noon on Dec. 7, 70 years after the attack. Curre's story of that horrible day was featured in NPR's Veteran's Day coverage last month.
NPR

A Bird's-Eye History Of Walking On Stilts

In 1411, the count of Namur banned the use of stilts in the Belgian city. Over the past 600 years, the elevated footwear has been used for everything from putting up drywall to fishing and even jousting.
NPR

'The Atlantic' Remembers Its Civil War Stories

In 1857, a group of American intellectuals founded The Atlantic and used it to challenge the institution of slavery. Now, on the 150th anniversary of the Civil War's beginning, a new issue of the magazine reaches back to a time when slavery — and the future of the United States — was still an open question.

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