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NPR

Opposition To Nazis Binds French Women In 'Train'

In January 1943, 230 women of the French Resistance were sent to Auschwitz. Only 49 of them came back. Journalist Caroline Moorehead's latest book chronicles the bond between the women that enabled them to make it through.
NPR

Polka-Dotted Horses? Cave Art May Not Be Fantasy

There is art beyond price in the caves of southwestern France. The paintings date back to the Paleolithic period and depict spotted horses, which, according to new research, may actually be how horses looked at the time. Guest host Linda Wertheimer speaks with Professor Terry O'Connor of the University of York in the United Kingdom about the ancient art.
NPR

The Bonus Army: How A Protest Led To The GI Bill

When World War I veterans returned from overseas, they were promised a cash bonus for their service — but they wouldn't get their money until 1945. Then the Great Depression struck. Desperate for relief, in 1932 a group of veterans from Portland, Ore., went to Washington to demand early payment. The protests led to violence — and eventually the GI Bill.
NPR

1st Black Marines: Fighting For The Right To Fight

In 1942, the first black recruits allowed in the Marines trained at a facility in North Carolina called Montford Point. They're being awarded a Congressional Gold Medal. But at first, the U.S. didn't want them fighting. Host Michel Martin speaks with the head of the Montford Point Marines Association, and 90-year-old former Marine James Rudolf Carter.
NPR

Living To Tell The Horrible Tale Of Pearl Harbor

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the attacks on Pearl Harbor. Thousands of Americans were killed that day. But Frank Curre, who was just a teenager when he enlisted in the Navy, survived the onslaught. He was assigned to the USS Tennessee.
NPR

Pa.'s Capital Looks To The Wild West To Raise Cash

The debt-saddled city of Harrisburg, Pa., teeters between municipal bankruptcy and a possible state takeover. The city does, however, have some unique Wild West artifacts that could help it get back in the black. Auctioning the items could raise much-needed funds.
NPR

For Gertrude Stein, Collecting Art Was A Family Affair

In the early 1900s, Gertrude Stein and her brothers filled their Paris apartments with avant-garde art. The Steins bought paintings right out of the studios of young, scandalous artists — Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse and others — who met and mingled at the Steins' salons.
WAMU 88.5

D.C. War Memorial Reopens This Week

The D.C. War Memorial, which commemorates the 499 District citizens who served in World War One, will reopen this week after more than a year of restoration work.

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