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Reagan Statue Installed At Airport

A new 9-foot-tall statue of Ronald Reagan now preside over Terminal A at Reagan National Airport.

WAMU 88.5

$10M Donation For White House History Center

The White House Historical Association has received a $10 million donation for a center on White House history in downtown D.C.

NPR

'Three Famines': A Struggle Shared Across The Globe

Famines, like the one happening in the Horn of Africa, share common threads with each other, even when they happen on different continents or in different centuries. Host Audie Cornish talks with Thomas Keneally, author of Three Famines: Starvation and Politics, about the modern history of famines.
NPR

Spy Satellite Engineer's Top Secret Is Revealed

Phil Pressel designed film cameras for a U.S. spy satellite program that was declassified last month after 46 years. His cameras captured Soviet missile sites and enabled President Nixon to sign an arms reduction treaty with the Soviet Union.
NPR

New Water Map Washes Away An Urban Legend

A new, revised map of San Francisco has hit the stands. It's not a street map or a bus map; it's a map of the city's underground waterways, and it includes a change that challenges the story of the city's birth.
NPR

Remembering The Father Of Artificial Intelligence

John McCarthy, the computer scientist who coined the term "artificial intelligence" in 1955, died Monday at age 84. Weekend Edition's math guy Keith Devlin has this remembrance.
NPR

The World Series As An Old Pro Sees It

Jim Bouton knows what it's like to stand on the pitching mound in a World Series with the world watching; he pitched three World Series games for the New York Yankees in 1963 and 64. Bouton's been watching this year's Series and shares his insights with host Scott Simon.
NPR

A Stone Carver's Daughter Tells Of Mount Rushmore

Luigi Del Bianco was the chief stone carver on the Mount Rushmore monument, working for years to bring the presidents' faces to life in stone. He gave Abraham Lincoln's face many of its details, in the project that ended 70 years ago. But to his family, Del Bianco was a modest, loving patriarch.
NPR

First Black Marines Receive Highest Civilian Honor

Nearly 70 years ago, the Marines became the last branch of the American military to accept blacks into their ranks. The first to serve at the segregated Marine base at Montford Point in North Carolina are relatively little known, compared to their fellow trail blazers in the Army's Buffalo Soldiers and the Air Force's Tuskegee Airmen — until now. Congress voted Tuesday to recognize the Montford Point Marines with the Congressional Gold Medal. Historian Melton McLaurin joins Michele Norris to discuss the black servicemen of the Montford Point Marines.

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