History | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

History

RSS Feed
NPR

A Bird's-Eye History Of Walking On Stilts

In 1411, the count of Namur banned the use of stilts in the Belgian city. Over the past 600 years, the elevated footwear has been used for everything from putting up drywall to fishing and even jousting.
NPR

'The Atlantic' Remembers Its Civil War Stories

In 1857, a group of American intellectuals founded The Atlantic and used it to challenge the institution of slavery. Now, on the 150th anniversary of the Civil War's beginning, a new issue of the magazine reaches back to a time when slavery — and the future of the United States — was still an open question.
NPR

A New Look At The Man Behind U.S. Cold War Policy

In the late 1970s, historian John Lewis Gaddis decided to write a biography of George F. Kennan, the author of the Cold War policy of containment. But the two men agreed it would not be published until after Kennan's death. Neither expected Kennan to live to 101, but now that he's gone, Gaddis has published George F. Kennan: An American Life.
NPR

Volunteers Rally To Save War Columnist's Museum

A museum dedicated to Pulitzer Prize-winning World War II columnist Ernie Pyle is in danger of closing. The site, in Pyle's hometown of Dana, Ind., attracts fewer than 2,000 visitors annually. The state recently cut off support to the museum and moved a number of the artifacts to the capitol. Now, a group of community volunteers is rallying to try to preserve the museum and Pyle's legacy.
NPR

Sen. Daniel Inouye On Pearl Harbor, After 70 Years

On Dec. 7, 1941, Senator Daniel Inouye, D-Haw., witnessed Japan bomb the naval base at Pearl Harbor. He speaks with host Michel Martin about his memories of that day, and what motivated him to serve in the Army once the government lifted restrictions designating all Japanese Americans as 'enemy aliens.'
NPR

Runner John Carlos: No Regrets On Olympic Salute

The long fight against injustice was symbolized by the image from the 1968 Olympics — when two African-American sprinters stood on the medal podium with their heads bowed and single fists thrust into the air. The moment turned the men into outcasts in their own country.
NPR

The Deep-Sea Find That Changed Biology

The depths of our oceans are dark, punishingly cold and utterly devoid of life. Or so scientists thought, until a team of researchers in the late 1970s stumbled upon squishy, rubbery worms, up to 7 feet long, living 8,000 feet below the surface of the Pacific.

Pages