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Oyster Ice Cream: A Thanksgiving Tradition Mark Twain Could Get Behind

Oyster ice cream may be more traditional fare than many of the dishes we serve for Thanksgiving, says chef José Andrés. He's showcasing American food history in his collaboration with the National Archives. But modern diners can appreciate this briny treat, too.
NPR

After Gadhafi, Libyans Try To Reclaim Their History

For decades, Moammar Gadhafi repressed and distorted Libyan history, attempting to subsume centuries of civilization under his cult of personality. For Gadhafi, Libyan history began and ended with the Bedouins and the fight against Italian colonization. Now Libyans are emerging from the revolution with a nascent desire to know who they really are. One family in particular is taking the lead in trying to restore to Libyans a sense of national identity, beyond tribal affiliations or geographical location, in hopes of refocusing attention on accepting diversity and getting along.
NPR

Timeline: The 100-Year History Of The Electric Car

The electric car was just as popular as its gasoline counterpart when it first went into production around the turn of the 20th century. But with the advent of highways, people wanted to go farther than their battery life allowed. Today's electric cars face similar challenges.
NPR

Pearl Harbor Survivors Meet For The Last Time

This weekend, the Southeastern chapter of the Pearl Harbor Survivors held its final meeting. Seventy years have passed since the attack on Pearl Harbor and surviving membership is dwindling, so the worldwide organization has finally decided to disband. Kate Sweeney of member station WABE reports.
NPR

Genocide Survivor To Sit On Holocaust Museum Board

President Obama has appointed Rwandan refugee Clemantine Wamariya to the board of the U.S. Holocaust Museum. Wamariya, who's an American now, talks to Renee Montagne about surviving the Rwandan genocide.
NPR

Documentary Shows Language Saved From Extinction

In 1993, Jessie Little Doe Baird had dreams in a language that her Wampanoag people stopped using more than 100 years ago. The new PBS film We Still Live Here shows how they brought their language back to life. Host Michel Martin speaks with director Anne Makepeace and Troy Currence, vice president of the Wopanaak Language Reclamation Project.

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