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Pope Francis' Comments: 'A Bridge, Not A Barrier'?

Pope Francis made headlines with his recent comments about gay priests. But many Catholics thought what he said about politics, poverty and women during his Brazil trip were just as ground-breaking. Host Michel Martin gets perspective from Father Leo Patalinghug and Professor Anthea Butler.
NPR

Barbershop Guys Take A Swing At Sports Controversies

The NFL slapped Philadelphia Eagle Riley Cooper on the wrist for an offensive slur he made off the field. But will his fellow players let him off so easily? The Barbershop guys weigh in on that and other sporting news.
WAMU 88.5

Historic D.C. Housing Project Marks 75 Years

Langston Terrace, D.C.'s first public housing project designed and built by African Americans, recently turned 75 years old.

WAMU 88.5

Md. 'Kinship Communities' Embrace Past, Work To Improve Present

We visit two of Maryland's "kinship communities," which were settled by former slaves after the Civil War.

WAMU 88.5

This Week On Metro Connection: Hall Of Fame

We'll reach into the Metro Connection archives this week and bring you some of our favorite stories from the past year.

NPR

To '60s Civil Rights Hero, Math Is Kids' Formula For Success

In the '60s, Bob Moses organized African-American sharecroppers in Mississippi for the Civil Rights movement. Since the 1980s, he's led the Algebra Project, teaching math to low-achieving students in underfunded public schools and advocating for quality public education as a constitutional right.
NPR

How Andrew Carnegie Turned His Fortune Into A Library Legacy

At the start of the 20th century, the ruthless, self-made steel industrialist paid $60 million for 1,689 public libraries to be built in communities around the U.S. "The man who dies rich dies in disgrace," Carnegie wrote.
WAMU 88.5

Proponents Of American Latino Museum Renew Their Case

A group calling for a Smithsonian museum to acknowledge the role that Hispanics have played in the history of the United States is reporting on their progress.

NPR

Pioneering 'Masters Of Sex' Brought Science To The Bedroom

William Masters and Virginia Johnson became famous in the 1960s for their research into the physiology of human sexuality. In Masters of Sex, biographer Thomas Maier explores the duo's research methods, which for years remained shrouded in secrecy.
WAMU 88.5

"Our Nixon:" A New Documentary

Most people know Richard Nixon secretly taped Oval Office conversations during his presidency. But few are aware that three of Nixon's top aides obsessively used home movie cameras to document their time at the White House; capturing...

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