History | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

History

RSS Feed
NPR

The Time Traveler's Cookbook: Meat-Lover's Edition

Want to eat like your distant ancestors? Try the gazelle tartare or the luau mammoth! You'll discover these recipes and more in our Time Traveler's Cookbook.
NPR

Putting A Positive Spin On Negative Campaigning

The general election is still months away, but President Obama and Mitt Romney are already hammering each other with attack ads. Negative campaigning is hardly new, and some say the 2012 race could be one of the most negative races in recent history. But is that really a bad thing?
WAMU 88.5

Smithsonian's Film Festival Features Clint Eastwood Westerns

A three-day film festival at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History is featuring Clint Eastwood westerns.

NPR

Lessons For Europe From 'The Second World War'

Historian Antony Beevor's new book uncovers telling details about the 20th century's greatest conflict, beginning with the unlikely story of a Korean conscript who was captured by almost every army involved in the war, before eventually ending up in Illinois.
WAMU 88.5

When History And Pop Culture Collide

The Hatfields and the McCoys. Oliver Stone's JFK. Roots: the miniseries. Hollywood often uses real history as a backdrop for dramatic stories, but you can't always tell where truth ends and fiction begins.

NPR

A Trailblazing Black Architect Who Helped Shape L.A.

When Paul Williams decided to become an architect, people told him no white clients would work with an African-American. But he persevered, eventually designing thousands of buildings, including the Beverly Hills Hotel and homes for stars like Frank Sinatra and Lucille Ball.
WAMU 88.5

The Dictionary Of American Regional English (Rebroadcast)

The fifth volume of the Dictionary of American Regional English covers "slug" to "zydeco." It is part of a 50-year project to capture regional dialects. Joan Hall, chief editor of the dictionary, and linguist Ben Zimmer join Diane to discuss what our language reveals about who we are.

NPR

Pakistan's 'Burushaski' Language Finds New Relatives

Robert Siegel talks to professor Ilija Casule of Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. His research shows that a language spoken by about 90,000 people in a remote area of Pakistan is Indo-European in origin. He explains how 20 years of research has tied this isolated group of people to a migration that started in the Balkans and moved East 3,000 years ago.

Pages