History

RSS Feed
NPR

Lead Poisoning Dates Back To Roman Times

Lead was found in Flint's water supply in 2014. Renee Montagne talks to Dr. Howard Markel, director of the Center for the History of Medicine at the University of Michigan about lead's long history.
NPR

American History Lives: A Story Of The People, By The People, For The People

All across the country, people are recreating, reinterpreting, acting out history in some way. These living historians remember the past – and they don't mind repeating it.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Senate Chamber Has Long Tradition Of Press Availability

The tradition of press access to the floor of the Virginia Senate goes back more than a century, but the recent move by state Republicans to banish journalists to the public viewing area is not actually without precedent.

NPR

Was Dr. Asperger A Nazi? The Question Still Haunts Autism

Hans Asperger identified autism as a spectrum of disorders in the 1930s, but his work was ignored for decades because he went on to work under the Nazis. Research and treatment suffered as a result.
WAMU 88.5

The Evolution and Future of American Conservatism

A history of contemporary American conservatism from Barry Goldwater to the Tea Party: What it means for the 2016 presidential election and the future of the GOP.

NPR

'In A Different Key' Traces History And Politics Of Autism

Authors John Donvan and Caren Zucker say parents have been "unsung heroes" in spurring more research on autism, and in getting many more kids out of institutions and into schools.
NPR

Aztec Gold: Watch The History And Science Of Popcorn

Popcorn has been around at least 4,000 years. The Aztecs even had a word for the sound of kernels popping — totopoca. On National Popcorn Day, ponder the story of this beloved snack.
NPR

First Mention: Pac-Man

NPR's feature "First Mention" goes back to 1981 to find an early reference to the game Pac-Man.
NPR

In California, A Treasure Hunt For Gold Rush-Era Fruit And Nut Trees

The search is on for heirloom varieties planted at homesteads and coach stops in the late 1800s. The resilient trees, still productive despite long neglect, could prove valuable at a time of drought.
NPR

Amid Controversy, Scholastic Pulls Picture Book About Washington's Slave

The book tells the story of Hercules, a slave who President George Washington used as a chef. The book shows Hercules and his daughter happy and taking pride in making Washington a birthday cake.

Pages