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NPR

In 'Dallas 1963,' A City Of Rage, Seized By 'Civic Hysteria'

Bill Minutaglio and Steven L. Davis have written a portrait of the city that saw John F. Kennedy's death firsthand. In those years, they say, Dallas was a roiling stew of superpatriotism and Communist paranoia — and, above all, distrust of the president.
NPR

Property Taxes May Cause Slaves' Descendants To Lose Homes

Sapelo Island, off the coast of Georgia, has been home to generations of African-Americans since their ancestors were freed from slavery. Now, they might be losing their homes as growing property values send tax bills through the roof. Host Michel Martin speaks with Sapelo Island resident Cornelia Walker Bailey about the situation.
NPR

Govt. Shutdown 'Wake-Up Call' To Native Americans

Native American tribes often rely on their relationship with federal agencies to keep themselves afloat. Host Michel Martin speaks with Tara Gatewood, host of the public radio show Native America Today, about how the government shutdown affects Native Americans. NPR Senior Business Editor Marilyn Geewax also joins the conversation.
NPR

How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines

For more than half a century, Americans have used "the boondocks" or "the boonies" to refer to a place in the middle of nowhere. But few people know that the phrase is a relic of American military occupation in the Philippines that was brought into the mainstream by a fatal training accident.
WAMU 88.5

Edgar Allan Poe House Reopens In Baltimore

After a six-month renovation, the Edgar Allan Poe House has reopened for limited weekend hours.

NPR

150 Years After Battle Of Gettysburg, Shutdown Hindering History Tours

As the federal government shutdown continues, national parks across the country remain closed to visitors. That includes the famous Gettysburg battlefield in Pennsylvania. But this year is the 150th anniversary of the battle that many historians consider the turning point of the Civil War. And Gettysburg is fighting to keep some of the crowds coming, even without federal funds.
NPR

At 300, Encyclopedia Pioneer May Yet Get A Hero's Burial

French philosopher Denis Diderot was the driving force behind one of the first compendiums of human knowledge, but his contributions have been largely lost to history. Now, the anniversary of his birth has prompted calls to reinter his remains in Paris' Pantheon, alongside the likes of Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.
NPR

Will Settlement Bring Black Farmers Dignity?

After years of discrimination from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, black farmers are now getting a $1.25 billion settlement. Founder and president of the National Black Farmers Association John Boyd tells host Michel Martin what this settlement means for farmers and their families.
NPR

These Folks Went Vegetarian Back When It Was Way Uncool

Today is World Vegetarian Day, but every day is reason to go meatless at Hiltl's, the world's oldest continually operating vegetarian restaurant. This pioneering place opened more than a century ago in meat-loving Zurich.
WAMU 88.5

Shahan Mufti: "The Faithful Scribe"

Journalist Shahan Mufti describes himself as "100 percent American and 100 percent Pakistani." We talk with Mufti about the importance of storytelling for people and nations alike, and Pakistan's role in world events.

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