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Solving The Riddle Of The Grand Canyon's Formation

The Grand Canyon may seem to be a simple case of "river carves rock," but to geologists, its formation is still puzzling. Ira Flatow and guests discuss the canyon's mysteries, and the scientific sleuthing being done to solve them--millions of years after the Colorado River carried off the evidence.
NPR

37 Years And Halfway Through Encyclopaedia Iranica

In 1974, Columbia University Professor Ehsan Yarshater began a comprehensive encyclopedia of Iranian history. Now, he's 91 years old and at the letter 'K.' Guest host Jacki Lyden discusses the project's scope and significance with Yarshater and contributor Ahmad Karimi-Hakkak, director of the Roshan Center for Persian Studies at the University of Maryland.
WAMU 88.5

NPS Commemorates Fort Marcy

The National Park Service commemorated Fort Marcy, a key point in defending the nation's capital against Confederate forces.

WAMU 88.5

Arlington National Cemetery Sees Fixes

arlington national cemetary

After reports of mismanagement marred assessments last year, the Army's Inspector General reports that operations at Arlington National Cemetery have improved considerably.

NPR

A Surprising Trip Through Bluegrass Country

Bill Monroe a legend of bluegrass music, which has been played on porches and in homes for generations. He would have been 100 years old this year. On the anniversary of his birth, writer Jason Cherkis journeyed through Kentucky to see how the musical genre has continued to evolve. He chronicles his trip in this week's Washington Post Magazine. He speaks with Michel Martin.
NPR

Michael Jackson, Through His Brother's Eyes

Two years after the King of Pop died, his brother Jermaine Jackson has released the memoir You are Not Alone. It tells of the Jackson 5 and Michael Jackson's childhood, career and struggles. Jermaine Jackson speaks with Michel Martin about his book and how his family has been coping.
NPR

Film Sheds Light On Hate Crimes, Sparks Action

In 2008, seven white teens killed an Ecuadorean immigrant who had lived in Patchogue, N.Y., for 13 years. The tragedy revealed a pattern of violence against Latinos in that town. The documentary Not In Our Town: Light in the Darkness chronicles the community's grief and outrage.
NPR

America's 2nd Largest Indian Tribe Expels Blacks

The Cherokee Nation recently stripped citizenship from a majority of African-Americans who descended from slaves of wealthy Cherokee Indians before the Civil War. Host Michel Martin discusses this controversial move with MacArthur Fellow Tiya Miles, who studies interrelated histories of African-Americans and Native Americans.
NPR

The Beatles: Fab Four AND Civil Rights Activists

An old Beatles performance contract set to be auctioned gives some new insight into the values of the Fab Four early in their career. The document is for a 1965 concert and states that the group "not be required to perform in front of a segregated audience." Host Audie Cornish has more.

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