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Dore: The Little Studio That Could (Produce Hits)

It's hard to believe today, but in the mid-1950s, Los Angeles didn't mean much in terms of popular music. But the coming of rock 'n' roll meant an infusion of tiny record labels — and one was Doré, run by a happy-go-lucky guy named Lew Bedell. Ed Ward tells its short, crazy story here.
NPR

Dancing Through History With First Ladies' Gowns

Every four years in January, Washington plays host to the country's biggest "prom." Inaugural balls bring out happy winners, administration bigwigs and a gown — on the first lady — that will become part of history. A Smithsonian exhibition displays some of those gowns.
NPR

Navajo Code Talker Keith Little Dies

One of the last remaining Navajo Code Talkers from World War II has died. Keith Little, who transmitted codes in important Pacific battles such as Iwo Jima and Saipan, died Tuesday at 87. He led the Navajo Code Talkers Association in recent years and fought to get recognition for the Code Talkers, who were ordered to keep their contribution to the war effort secret for decades after the war ended.
NPR

Sinking Ship? Saving The Historic Kalakala Ferry

When it debuted in 1935, the Kalakala was a Seattle icon. These days, the art deco ferryboat is better known for its fight to survive both on water and in local memory.
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Big Honors For African-Americans' Small 'Firsts'

Steve Jobs and Amy Winehouse were among the stars who died in 2011, but what about the first African-American milk delivery man in Gary, Ind., or the first black meter reader for Baltimore Gas and Electric? Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson says these stories show how far the U.S. has come. She recently wrote about this in The New York Times Magazine, and speaks with host Michel Martin.
NPR

For Some Tribes, New Year's Foods Provide A Sacred Link To The Past

Native American tribes in Eastern Oregon recently marked kimtee inmewit, a ceremony that welcomes the sacred new foods of the new year. The tribes see these foods not just as nourishment, but as a connection to ancestors.
NPR

The Changing Face Of America's Chinatowns

For centuries, people from China have immigrated to major cities in the United States. There, many formed their own neighborhoods known today as Chinatowns. But with China's economy booming and the U.S. economy faltering, these historic neighborhoods are seeing declining populations and new demographics.

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