History | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

History

RSS Feed
NPR

Lost Malcolm X Speech Heard Again 50 Years Later

Brown University senior Malcolm Burnley was working on a class assignment in the library archives last fall when he made a startling discovery: a forgotten speech that Malcolm X, the Muslim minister and human rights activist, had made to the university in 1961.
NPR

While Graceland Booms, Other Historic Homes Rot

Miles Davis was honored with a postage stamp, but his childhood home has fallen into disrepair. Only a few homes of the talented and famous become tourist meccas like Graceland or Monticello. Architecture, beauty and politics all play a role.
NPR

A Studio On The Road To 'Fame' For Soul Musicians

One capital of soul in the 1960s? Muscle Shoals, Ala., a fly-speck on the map which spawned some of the era's greatest recordings, via productions in Rick Hall's Fame Studios. Rock historian Ed Ward has their story.
NPR

Celebrating The Legacy Of Langston Hughes

The works of Langston Hughes reflect the lives and struggles of African Americans, and celebrate the richness of the culture. February 1, 2012 marked the 110th anniversary of the late poet, musician and playwright's birth.
WAMU 88.5

A Family Guards An Open Secret

Open Secret filmmaker Steve Lickteig talks with Rebecca Sheir about his discovery that his oldest sister was actually his biological mother - a secret his family had kept from him for 18 years.

NPR

Report Suggests 'End Of The Segregated Century'

The Manhattan Institute reports that U.S. metropolitan areas are now more integrated than any time since 1910. The migration of African Americans to the South, gentrification and immigration have all contributed to the shift. Yet some argue the decline of segregation does not mean racial inequality is obsolete.
NPR

The Legacy Of Civil Rights Leader Fred Korematsu

Several American cities celebrated Fred Korematsu Day Monday. Korematsu fought the executive order that incarcerated thousands of Japanese Americans during World War II. His case went to the Supreme Court, and in 1988, thousands of surviving internees and heirs began receiving reparations.
WAMU 88.5

Staying True To Gen. McPherson's Good Name

'There's no fear in McPherson,' or, why we're pronouncing it mc-FUR-son and contradicting what many D.C. natives believe is the right way.

Pages