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NPR

Ballard: 100 Years Later, Titanic Still Captivates

On April 10, 1912, the Titanic set sail for New York City. The rest of the story has been the subject of countless books, shows and films about the legend of the "unsinkable" ship. Bob Ballard, the explorer who discovered the Titanic wreckage, talks about why the Titanic still matters.
WAMU 88.5

New Clues about the Sinking of Titanic

It's been 100 years since the British ocean liner Titanic sank in the North Atlantic, killing more than 1,500 people. Now, high-definition images made possible by advances in optical technology offer new clues about the ship’s violent descent to the sea floor.

WAMU 88.5

Howard Theatre Officially Reopens

City officials will cut the ribbon today on the renovated Howard Theatre, a recently renovated historic landmark that had previously been empty for more than three decades.

NPR

Exposing Indonesia's Cold War Communist Purge

The wall of silence in Indonesia surrounding one of the 20th century's worst atrocities is beginning to fall apart. A forthcoming report estimates that in the mid-1960s, the Indonesian military killed up to 1 million suspected communists, and places blame squarely on former military dictator Suharto.
NPR

Veteran Newsman Mike Wallace Of '60 Minutes' Dies

No question was too pointed during Mike Wallace's storied and notorious television career. The ambush interview. The gotcha. That trademark inflection conveying disbelief. Was there ever a more entertaining American television interviewer than Wallace? He died Saturday at 93.
NPR

A Brief History Of The Mobile Phone

Early on, experts predicted about a million Americans would have cell phones by the turn of century. They were wrong. The actual number was more than 100 times that estimate. NPR's Wendy Kaufman explores the history of the mobile phone.
NPR

Lust, Lies And Empire: The Fishy Tale Behind Eating Fish On Friday

A long-standing myth holds that Catholics eat fish on Fridays because of a secret pact a medieval pope made to sell more fish. That's just a fish tale. The real story behind fish Fridays is much better.
NPR

How Homo Sapiens Became 'Masters Of The Planet'

The first Homo sapiens appeared on the planet some 200,000 years ago. But even though they looked fully human, they didn't act fully human until they began creating symbolic art, some 100,000 years later. Paleoanthropologist Ian Tattersall discusses those human origins in his book Masters of the Planet.
WAMU 88.5

Michael Rosen: "Dignity: Its History and Meaning" (Rebroadcast)

Dignity plays a central role in current thinking about law and human rights, but there is sharp disagreement about its meaning. Diane and her guest discuss modern conceptions of dignity.

WAMU 88.5

Clothing Size Conundrum

Find clothing size variations frustrating? It's not you - it's the clothes.

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