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NPR

Historian Seeks Artifacts From Lincoln's Last Days

In preparation for a book about Abraham Lincoln's life at the end of the Civil War, historian Noah Andre Trudeau is in search of witnesses. The last week of Lincoln's life in April 1865 is a largely unexamined period. Trudeau is seeking diary entries, letters or stories of people who encountered Lincoln at the time.
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A Washingtonian Remembers A Capitol Hill Long Gone

A 93-year-old writer remembers her childhood on Capitol Hill in her new book, 301 East Capitol: Tales from the Heart of the Hill.
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Before The Internet, TV Was The Disruptive News Technology

The Internet has been lauded in the last several years for its role in affecting social change across the globe. It's easy to forget that decades ago, it was television news that was helping people agitate for change.

NPR

How Should We Welcome Home Iraq War Veterans?

St. Louis, Mo. held a parade for veterans of the Iraq War in January 2012 that drew an estimated 20,000 participants and 100,000 spectators. Fifteen other cities are considering similar parades, but some argue that such celebrations should not be held while the war in Afghanistan continues.
NPR

Dickens At 200: A Birthday You Can't 'Bah Humbug'

For nearly two centuries, Charles Dickens' colorful characters and memorable expressions have worked their way into the vernacular. The prolific 19th-century English novelist left behind 989 named characters and two dozen novels full of the pathos and comedy of London's rich and poor.
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Archives Unveils Restored Magna Carta

After millions of dollars worth of restoration, the National Archives is unveiling its newly restored copy of the Magna Carta later this month.

NPR

A Tale Of Two Centuries: Charles Dickens Turns 200

The beloved storyteller was born on Feb. 7, 1812. He had little formal education, but his novels made him famous in his own time, and continue as classics in ours. His two-dozen works of fiction have never gone out of print.
NPR

Lost Malcolm X Speech Heard Again 50 Years Later

Brown University senior Malcolm Burnley was working on a class assignment in the library archives last fall when he made a startling discovery: a forgotten speech that Malcolm X, the Muslim minister and human rights activist, had made to the university in 1961.
NPR

While Graceland Booms, Other Historic Homes Rot

Miles Davis was honored with a postage stamp, but his childhood home has fallen into disrepair. Only a few homes of the talented and famous become tourist meccas like Graceland or Monticello. Architecture, beauty and politics all play a role.
NPR

A Studio On The Road To 'Fame' For Soul Musicians

One capital of soul in the 1960s? Muscle Shoals, Ala., a fly-speck on the map which spawned some of the era's greatest recordings, via productions in Rick Hall's Fame Studios. Rock historian Ed Ward has their story.

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