History | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

History

RSS Feed
NPR

The Religious Language In U.S. Foreign Policy

Historian Andrew Preston says questions in an undergraduate class he was teaching at the start of the 2003 invasion of Iraq spurred the research for his new book, Sword of the Spirit, Shield of Faith. "Once I started looking for religion [in U.S. foreign policy], it was everywhere," he says.
NPR

'Emancipating Lincoln': A Pragmatic Proclamation

In a new book, historian Harold Holzer explores the carefully calibrated timing and delivery of Lincoln's ultimatum to the rebellious states. Though the proclamation has been criticized as weak, Holzer says that Lincoln did what he had to do to make the order palatable in a perilous time.
NPR

Bad Girls Of History, How Wicked Were They?

Egypt's Cleopatra was called "Serpent of the Nile," and England's Mary Tudor, was called "Bloody Mary." But were these names fair? That's the question editor Shirin Yim Bridges raises in the tween book series, The Thinking Girl's Treasury of Dastardly Dames. She speaks with host Michel Martin as part of Tell Me More's biography series.
WAMU 88.5

Michael Rosen: "Dignity: Its History and Meaning"

Dignity plays a central role in current thinking about law and human rights, but there is sharp disagreement about its meaning. Diane and her guest discuss modern conceptions of dignity.

NPR

'If Walls Could Talk': A History Of The Home

Why did the flushing toilet take centuries to catch on? When did strangers stop sharing beds? And how did people brush their teeth with fish bones? Historical curator Lucy Worsley details the intimate history of the bedroom, bathroom and kitchen in her new book.
NPR

Vegas Museum Offers A Mob History You Can't Refuse

Exhibits at the Las Vegas Mob Museum explore the notorious, 20th-century rivalry between coppers and mobsters. Visitors can listen to wiretaps, practice FBI-style surveillance, spray pretend bullets from a Tommy gun and even participate in their own police lineups.
NPR

Aging U.S. Carrier Enterprise Heads For Final Deployment

Aircraft carrier that served in hotspots, including the Cuban Missile Crisis, for more than five decades heads out on its final mission.
NPR

Life At Jefferson's Monticello, As His Slaves Saw It

Thomas Jefferson, a man who dedicated much of his life to the idea of liberty, owned more than 600 slaves throughout his lifetime. A new exhibition, "Slavery at Jefferson's Monticello: Paradox of Liberty," invites visitors to reconsider what they know about the nation's third president.
WAMU 88.5

Women Veterans Of Korean War Honored

Women have served our armed forces for centuries, but it wasn't until the Korean War that women began to take a really active role. The Department of Defense is commemorating them for Women's History Month.

Pages