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WAMU 88.5

Historic D.C. Housing Project Marks 75 Years

Langston Terrace, D.C.'s first public housing project designed and built by African Americans, is turning 75 years old.

NPR

Cold War Bunker Network Repurposed For 21st Century Threats

In Charlotte, N.C., a secret bunker rests quietly below a radio station. Built in 1963, it was part of a federal network designed to provide emergency communications in case of a nuclear attack. With a new slew of potential threats to contend with, FEMA has revived the idea.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Historical Society To Hold Presentation On Slave Name Database

The Virginia Historical Society is promoting a database with over 10,000 slave names.

NPR

'Above All Things' Tells The Story Of A Mountain, A Marriage

George Mallory, famed mountaineer, perished in his attempt to be the first man to summit Mount Everest. Tanis Rideout's debut novel combines the tale of that famous climb with the lesser-known story of George's wife, Ruth.
NPR

Reading The Love Letters Of Lyndon B. Johnson

For Valentine's Day, the Lyndon B. Johnson library released letters from the courtship period between the late president and his wife, Lady Bird. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin presents some of the highlights.
NPR

'Armory Show' That Shocked America In 1913, Celebrates 100

The exhibition, which opened on Feb. 17, 1913, at the 69th Regiment Armory in New York City, became an important event in the history of American art. It introduced astonished New Yorkers to modern art, like Marcel Duchamp's cubist Nude Descending a Staircase.
NPR

The 'Baby Dolls' Of Mardi Gras: A Fun Tradition With A Serious Side

The baby dolls were born from racial segregation in New Orleans in 1912. A group of African-American prostitutes decided to express themselves through dance and costumes, challenging taboo by parading during Mardi Gras.
NPR

Is Honest Abe's Stovepipe Hat A Fake?

State officials in Illinois want to conduct DNA tests on the top hat on display at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum to see if he ever really wore it. Museum officials think the idea is worse than bad.
NPR

The State of Indian Country: Global Tribes?

Two days after President Obama's State of the Union address on Tuesday, the president of the National Congress of American Indians held his own address about how tribes across the country are faring. Host Michel Martin speaks with Jacqueline Pata, the group's executive director, to learn more about this year's priorities for Indian Country.

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