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Adrift In Frigid Water, Not Caring 'If You Live Or Die'

A ship called the Daniel J. Morrell was making its last haul of the season when it broke apart in a heavy storm on Lake Huron in November 1966. A few crew members struggled to stay afloat in the driving wind and waves, but ultimately, Dennis Hale was the shipwreck's sole survivor.
NPR

Nelson Mandela: An Audio History

A Radio Diaries documentary offers a window into South Africa's half-century-long struggle for democracy through rare sound recordings of freedom fighter Nelson Mandela — and those who fought with and against him.
NPR

The First Time I Heard The Name 'Mandela'

The South African leader's life held special power for black Americans, who lost many iconic civil rights leaders tragically early. Karen Grigsby Bates reflects on Mandela's legacy.
WAMU 88.5

Nelson Mandela Was Inspiration For D.C., Local Leaders

Nelson Mandela, who passed away at age 95 on Thursday, left a lasting legacy in the District, where his struggle against Apartheid served as an inspiration for local civil rights leaders.

WAMU 88.5

Remaking The Image Of A Washingtonian Who Made Over the City

Controversial though he may be, Alexander Robey Shepherd had some big dreams for the city he called home.

NPR

'King Cocktail' Serves Up Prohibition History, Hangover Cure

Prohibition ended 80 years ago today. To mark the occasion, Dale DeGroff, the man many credit with reviving the art of the cocktail, joins NPR to talk about the era's lasting effect on American life, current trends in bartending, and to share a few of his favorite recipes.
NPR

Underground Cities And 'Ghost' Miners: What Some People Do For Gold

South Africa's Mponeng gold mine is a 2.5-mile-deep network of chutes and tunnels that employs about 4,000 miners. Of course, that number doesn't include the miners who wander its tunnels clandestinely, stealing and refining ore. In a new book, journalist Matthew Hart investigates why gold and crime sometimes go hand in hand.
NPR

Upset Over Divisive Political Culture? Blame Burke And Paine

Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep talks to writer Yuval Levin about the origins of the American political right and left. In his new book The Great Debate, Levin traces the birth of the left/right divide to the views of two men: Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine.
NPR

Florida Tribe Re-Creates Daring Escape From The Trail Of Tears

More than 150 years ago, Polly Parker, a Seminole Indian, organized and led an escape from federal troops who were deporting Indians to the West. Parker traveled through hundreds of miles of wilderness to get back to tribal lands. The tribe is marking the event by following that dangerous journey.
NPR

In Gujarat, Anti-Muslim Legacy Of 2002 Riots Still Looms

Indian writer Zahir Janmohamed was in Gujarat, India, during the 2002 riots that left more than a thousand Muslims dead. He talks with NPR's Rachel Martin about the riots, and how Muslims have fared in Gujarat since then under Narendra Modi, who is now a leading candidate to be India's next prime minister.

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