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The Moral And Economic Costs Of Slavery

The film "Twelve Years a Slave" is a brutal reminder of the connection between America's early economic success and the North American slave trade. Facing up to the moral and economic cost of slavery.

NPR

Talk To The Head Honcho; He Speaks Japanese

While "honcho" is often mistakenly believed to have Spanish origins, it actually traces its roots to American soldiers who fought in the Pacific during World War II.
NPR

That's Not What She Said? 7 Quotes You May Be Getting Wrong

Did Winston Churchill say, "You can always count on the American people to do the right thing, after they have exhausted all other possibilities"? Take our quiz to find out.
NPR

Botched Investigation Fuels Kennedy Conspiracy Theories

It's been 50 years since President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, and polls show that a majority of Americans still believe Kennedy was the victim of a conspiracy, not a lone assassin. Philip Shenon, author of A Cruel and Shocking Act, explores what keeps these conspiracy theories alive.
NPR

International Bugging: Why The U.S. Snoops

News organizations in France, Germany and Spain have reported wide-spread monitoring by the National Security Agency in their countries. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with journalists from Der Spiegel and Le Figaro, about the recent revelations.
NPR

A Churchill 'Quote' That U.S. Politicians Will Never Surrender

Winston Churchill's backhanded compliment to Americans — that they'll always do the right thing, after trying everything else — is often repeated by members of Congress. There's no evidence that Churchill ever said it, but don't expect that to stop politicians from quoting it.

NPR

How The World Backed Polio Into A Corner

Just a few decades ago, polio was crippling more than a thousand children each day. Now the paralyzing virus remains endemic to only three countries. A timeline shows how polio went from one of the most feared illnesses to a disease on the ropes.
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Sackler Gallery Explores History of Yoga In New Exhibit

A local museum recently unveiled a new exhibit that's the first of its kind.

NPR

A Sweet And Sour History Of Our Obsession With Candy

You may blame a love of Snickers for those too-tight jeans, but in the early 20th century, the accusations were more serious: Candy was blamed for moral and physical decay. In Candy: A Century of Panic and Pleasure, Samira Kawash traces our love/hate relationship with sweets.
NPR

N.Y. Chinatown Family Finds Roots In Early Chinese Cinema

The Lee family, long-known for selling insurance in New York's Chinatown, once helped produce, distribute and screen Chinese-language films — business ventures that descendants only recently discovered when putting together a new exhibit at the Museum of Chinese in America.

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