History | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

History

RSS Feed
NPR

Discovery Sparks Interest In Forgotten Black Scholar

Three years ago, a Chicago man found historic documents in an abandoned house and took them to a rare-books dealer. The papers and books belonged to Richard T. Greener, a 19th century intellectual, who was the first African-American to graduate from Harvard University.
WAMU 88.5

A Genetic Portrait : What's in America's DNA?

Surprising facts and challenging insights are being revealed regularly now that geneticists are applying DNA testing to ideas about history and human migration. What one world-famous geneticist is finding out about America's shared past...

WAMU 88.5

To The Mountaintop: Charlayne Hunter-Gault

For more than 40 years, she's been a reliable and engaging journalist on public radio and television. But did you know Charlayne Hunter-Gault was a civil rights pioneer while still a teenager...

NPR

The Artful Reinvention Of Klansman Asa Earl Carter

Since its first publication in 1976, The Education of Little Tree has sold more than 1 million copies. But the book and its author are not what they seem. That's because before Forrest Carter became a Cherokee novelist, he was Asa Earl Carter, a Ku Klux Klan organizer and segregationist.
NPR

The St. Cuthbert Gospel: Looking Pretty Good At 1,300

The St. Cuthbert Gospel was buried alongside its titular saint in the late seventh century, making it Europe's oldest intact book. After a massive fundraising campaign, the British Library acquired the handwritten, leather-bound tome, which is in surprisingly good condition.
NPR

A Century Of Joy And Heartbreak At Fenway Park

The nation's oldest ballpark is turning 100. Boston's Fenway Park has been home to the Red Sox through some of baseball's greatest highs and most heartbreaking lows. It may be an act of the baseball gods that the park narrowly escaped the fate of similar old stadiums that were torn down.

Pages