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NPR

Years Later, He Brought Her Passport Back

When 85-year-old Betty Werther was young, she traveled the world. Sixty years later, she got a call. It was a fellow Berkeley alum, and he had found something that belonged to her. What he brought, however, was more than a souvenir.
NPR

Convicted Nazi Camp Guard John Demjanjuk Dies

John Demjanjuk, the retired U.S. autoworker convicted on 28,060 counts of being an accessory to murder, died Saturday at the age of 91. Demjanjuk died a free man in a nursing home in southern Germany, where he had been released pending his appeal.
WAMU 88.5

Jon Gertner: "The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation"

Bell Labs in New Jersey was to technological innovation in the mid-20th century what Silicon Valley in California is today. An editor at Fast Company magazine describes the environment which fostered 13 Nobel Prize winners and the development of radars, lasers, transistors, satellites and mobile phones.

WAMU 88.5

Viewing Social Injustice Through Virginia's Living History

Instead of deferring to the history books on the issue of Virginia's segregationist past, several groups are calling for a renewed focus on building a living history from those who were actually there.

NPR

The Religious Language In U.S. Foreign Policy

Historian Andrew Preston says questions in an undergraduate class he was teaching at the start of the 2003 invasion of Iraq spurred the research for his new book, Sword of the Spirit, Shield of Faith. "Once I started looking for religion [in U.S. foreign policy], it was everywhere," he says.
NPR

'Emancipating Lincoln': A Pragmatic Proclamation

In a new book, historian Harold Holzer explores the carefully calibrated timing and delivery of Lincoln's ultimatum to the rebellious states. Though the proclamation has been criticized as weak, Holzer says that Lincoln did what he had to do to make the order palatable in a perilous time.
NPR

Bad Girls Of History, How Wicked Were They?

Egypt's Cleopatra was called "Serpent of the Nile," and England's Mary Tudor, was called "Bloody Mary." But were these names fair? That's the question editor Shirin Yim Bridges raises in the tween book series, The Thinking Girl's Treasury of Dastardly Dames. She speaks with host Michel Martin as part of Tell Me More's biography series.
WAMU 88.5

Michael Rosen: "Dignity: Its History and Meaning"

Dignity plays a central role in current thinking about law and human rights, but there is sharp disagreement about its meaning. Diane and her guest discuss modern conceptions of dignity.

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