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WAMU 88.5

Dan Jones: "The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England" (Rebroadcast)

The Plantagenets were the dynasty that directly preceded the Tudors, ruling England for longer than any family before or since. Diane and bestselling author and historian, Dan Jones, discuss how their realm shaped England into the country we recognize today.

NPR

Does Equal Justice For All Include The Poor?

The U.S. Department of Justice recently announced $6.7 million in grants to provide more legal defense services for the indigent. But will the money really help with what some critics call overworked, underpaid, and poorly trained public defenders? Host Michel Martin asks law professor Eve Primus and Jonathan Rapping of Gideon's Promise.
NPR

How'd They Do That? The Story Of A Giant Rock And A Road Of Ice

Huge stone slabs weighing up to 300 tons that now reside in Beijing's Forbidden City were slid more than 40 miles in 15th- and 16th-century China over water-lubricated ice roads in the dead of winter. Though spoked wheels had been around for almost 3,000 years, the ice roads were smoother and required less manpower.
NPR

Teddy Roosevelt's 'Bully Pulpit' Isn't The Platform It Once Was

Roosevelt described the power of the presidency to shape public opinion as "The Bully Pulpit." That's also the title of a new book from presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, in which she explains the unique relationships Roosevelt forged with reporters.
NPR

Far From Diwali's Lights, The Warm Glow Of Home

South Asian communities around the world are celebrating good over evil, knowledge over ignorance, light over darkness. Sunday is Diwali, the Hindu Festival of Lights. The holiday isn't well-known in the U.S., though, so families rely on themselves to keep the tradition alive.
NPR

Scientist's Scuba Trip Sparks Search For 'Vanished' WWII Plane

On Sept. 1, 1944, a B-24 bomber went down in the South Pacific. The wreckage, and the airmen, seemed to disappear. Almost 50 years later, a scientist on vacation in Palau found an airplane wing and went on an obsessive, decade-long quest to find what happened to the plane. Author Wil S. Hylton joins NPR to discuss his new book on the mystery.
NPR

Lincoln's 272 Words, A Model Of Brevity For Modern Times

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library Foundation has asked presidents, poets and sailors aboard the USS Lincoln to write their own 272 words on the Gettysburg Address, or another subject of their choice. NPR's Scott Simon shares the piece he wrote for the exhibit commemorating 150 years since Lincoln's famous (and famously brief) speech.
NPR

Churchill's Dirty Tricks Squad

As England was fighting for its life against the Nazis, the British government sent its most charming spies — including Roald Dahl, Ian Fleming, Noel Coward and David Ogilvy — to America to blackmail, bully and cajol the U.S. into the war effort. Host Scott Simon speaks with author Jennet Conant about her book, The Irregulars, and the British spy ring that operated in Washington, D.C., during World War II.
WAMU 88.5

Wil Hylton: "Vanished"

After World War II, the U.S. government declared 73,000 soldiers MIA. The search for the missing men and the ongoing quest by explorers and scientists to bring closure to families.

WAMU 88.5

"Ask A Slave" With Azie Dungey

When D.C. native Azie Dungey returned to the region after college, she found work as an interpreter for local historic sites. As an African-American telling the story of a slave at Mount Vernon, she was asked questions both absurd and...

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