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Booking A Flight For The 'Golden Age Of Hijacking'

In the 1960s, catching a flight wasn't much of a hassle. No lines, no security screenings and no need to show ID. But the ease of travel brought with it some serious consequences.
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As The Lead Cools, Some See Their New Year Take Shape

Is that a cross? A ship with a figurehead? It's only human to wonder what the future will hold, especially on the threshold of a new year. In one German tradition, fortune-seekers drop molten lead into cold water — then it's anyone's guess what the strange shapes portend.
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'42' Gets The Story Of Jackie Robinson Right

Biographer Arnold Rampersad is "a bit of a stickler for accuracy," but he finds that — with a few exceptions — the 2013 biopic about Robinson's integration of Major League Baseball really rings true.
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Harlem In Photographs: Troubled Neighborhood To Source Of Pride

Camilo José Vergara says documenting a "world of losing ... a world where things diminish" is "awfully good training for life." His new photo book, Harlem: The Unmaking of a Ghetto, shows the neighborhood's transormation over 40 years.
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Poetry Uncovers Legacy Of Medgar Evers 50 Years Later

The assassination of civil rights leader Medgar Evers has been chronicled in films and books. Now the voices of his widow --and his killer-- are reimagined in a collection of poetry. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Frank X Walker about his book, "Turn Me Loose: The Unghosting of Medgar Evers."
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Writing 'Rudolph': The Original Red-Nosed Manuscript

Everybody knows Rudolph was the last reindeer to join Santa's crew, but few people know about the department store employee who brought his story to the world. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer was written by Robert L. May, a copywriter for Montgomery Ward, who, like his protagonist, had always felt like a bit of an outcast.
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The Extraordinary Story Of Why A 'Cakewalk' Wasn't Always Easy

We call something that is easily done a "cakewalk." But why? The surprising answer dates back to a dance popular among slaves and plantation owners in the pre-Civil War South.
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A Locked Door, A Secret Meeting And The Birth Of The Fed

The creation of America's central bank includes a bunch of bankers locked in a private library and a secret trip to a place called Jekyll Island.
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Reporter's Notebook: 'What Part Of Sacred Don't You Understand?'

The controversy over the recent Paris auctions of Hopi objects boils down to competing definitions of what is sacred. The same tension exists elsewhere in Indian Country where economic development projects are proposed for land Native Americans consider to be holy.
NPR

A Jew And A Latino Walk Into A Recording Studio...

It's an era of music that has faded from memory, but some say it's an integral part of American history: Latin-Jewish music in the mid-20th century. Steve Berlin of Chicano band Los Lobos says if this were the soundtrack to his Hebrew school experience, he would have never dropped out.

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