History

RSS Feed
NPR

Museum Employee Breaks Napoleon's Chair

An employee at a museum on the Mediterranean island of Corsica was tempted to sit in Napoleon's chair. Of course it collapsed. The museum covered up the incident until the chair was fixed.
NPR

The Beatles, As America First Loved Them

Later, they'd get weird, experimental, and rebellious, but when the Beatles made their U.S. television debut 50 years ago, they were still just a band — but a magically brilliant band.
NPR

Beatlemania! When The Fab Four Rocked The Lunchroom

Soon after they arrived on U.S. shores, The Beatles infiltrated just about every part of American pop culture — including lunchboxes. Fans have been known to shell out more than $1,000 for an authentic 1960s lunchbox featuring the band.
NPR

Collecting The Letters Of Wartime

Letters written in a time of war reflect almost universal longing and loss, no matter the century or the enemy. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Andrew Carroll, the director of the Center for American War Letters, about his personal collection of wartime correspondence from every American conflict, going back to 1776.
NPR

Memento Of A Lost Childhood: Anne Frank's Marbles

Before her family went into hiding, Anne Frank gave away some of her toys to her neighbor, Toosje Kupers. The gift included a set of marbles, now on display at at an art gallery in Rotterdam. NPR's Scott Simon takes a moment to note the childhood gift.
NPR

Wacky Moments In Winter Olympic History

The problems with decrepit hotel rooms and stray dogs in Sochi, Russia, are stealing the headlines, but they are hardly the first Olympics to stumble. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Esquire Magazine's AJ Jacobs about some of the more inglorious moments in Winter Olympics history.
WAMU 88.5

Beatles '64: D.C.'s Time In The Rock And Roll Spotlight

On Feb. 11, 1964, Washington, D.C. was thrown into the center of the musical universe when the Beatles played their first North American concert right in the heart of Washington, D.C.

NPR

Russia Hopes Sochi Ceremonies Stop 'Toilet Tweeting'

As the Winter Olympic Games get underway in Sochi, host Michel Martin speaks with Russian culture expert Jennifer Eremeeva about what the opening ceremonies can teach us about Russia and its people.
NPR

Behind The Movie, Tales From The Real-Life 'Monuments Men'

George Clooney anchors a thriller about a celebrated military unit that worked to recover and protect precious art and artifacts during the chaos at the end of World War II. NPR's Joel Rose reports on the mission — and some of the surviving members.
NPR

In Sochi, An Olympic Artist Sees The 'Possible'

Artist Marc Ahr has been drawing the Olympics for 22 years. For him, it doesn't matter what the press narrative is, how the countries are preparing, or even who wins or loses. Asked about negative news surrounding Sochi, he says that here, "everything is impossible, but everything is possible."

Pages