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WAMU 88.5

Mid-Atlantic Gadget 'Geeks' Pursue Passion for Antique Radios

Members of the Mid-Atlantic Antique Radio Club say old radios are more than just electronics; they're works of art.

WAMU 88.5

The Real Legacy Of Martin Luther King Jr. (Rebroadcast)

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch argues that while we invoke Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s name frequently, few understand the principles he championed or the history of race relations in America.

NPR

Poverty: 'We Need To Talk About It As It Is, Not As It Was'

Host Michel Martin shares her thoughts about why poverty conversations are needed, in her regular "Can I Just Tell You" essay.
NPR

A Woman Comes To Terms With Her Family's Slave-Owning Past

Kate Byroade had always known her ancestors were slave owners, but she had been told their slaves were treated well. Understanding the truth took her on a difficult lifelong journey. Americans are shy "about calling out the great wickedness of slavery," she says. "We should not be."
NPR

Lake Placid: A National Incubator For Winter Sport Olympians

In Vancouver four years ago, athletes who grew up in the Adirondack Mountains in upstate New York accounted for about one in 10 medals garnered by the U.S. In this region, the Olympics don't seem like a pipe dream, and they don't seem like ancient history — the Olympics is just sort of what people do.
NPR

Discovering Grief And Freedom In A Family's History Of Slavery

Robert Goins was tracing his genealogy when he found his ancestors' names listed among livestock and farm implements in a plantation ledger. With that painful discovery, he kept digging until he found a very different story: that of a great-great-great-grandfather who lived as a freeman.
NPR

Decades Later, Desegregation Still On The Docket In Little Rock

Since the violent 1957 standoff over the integration of Central High School, federal courts have been involved in Little Rock school affairs. Now a deal by the state, school districts and lawyers representing black students could end that oversight.
NPR

Death Squads Re-created 'The Act Of Killing' For The Camera

The film The Act of Killing visits former Indonesian death squad killers who wrought havoc from 1965, slaughtering between half- and 2 million people in a genocide often forgotten. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer about his new documentary, which is shortlisted for an Oscar nomination.
NPR

McDonnell Douglas DC-9 Flies Into Retirement

A Delta Air Lines flight from Minneapolis to Atlanta on Monday marked the end of an era for the McDonnell Douglas DC-9. The passenger jet first took flight in 1965 and was known for its relatively small size, which let it land on short runways and expand air travel across the nation.
NPR

American Literature And The 'Mythos Of The Boozing Writer'

In her new book, The Trip To Echo Spring, Olivia Laing investigates the role of drinking in the lives of six great American writers: Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, John Cheever, John Berryman, Tennessee Williams and Raymond Carver.

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