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Shenandoah Valley Farmhouse Goes Historic

The Shenandoah Valley farmhouse has been added to the Virginia Landmarks Register.

NPR

'Agent Garbo,' The Spy Who Lied About D-Day

Juan Pujol Garcia lived a lie that helped win World War II. Nicknamed for the enigmatic actress Greta Garbo, Garcia's own performance was so convincing he fooled Hitler himself.
NPR

Manju: A Taste Of Home For Seattle's Japanese Community

Manju are traditional Japanese dough buns, often filled with sweet bean paste, that are best eaten fresh. A Seattle native recently opened a manju bakery to replace one he remembers fondly from childhood.
NPR

USS Iowa's Guns Are Now For Show

The battleship ferried Franklin Roosevelt to a historic meeting during World War II and parried Russians in the Cold War. Now the USS Iowa is setting course for a second life as a museum.
NPR

Portraits: Texas Ranchers Remember An Epic Drought

Their faces have weathered decades of hardship.
NPR

Sending Vets' Lost Medals, And Memories, Home

Zachariah Fike finds old military medals for sale in antique stores and on the Internet, tracks down the medals' owners, and returns them. So far, Fike — who earned a Purple Heart when he was wounded in Afghanistan on Sept. 11, 2010 — is 5 for 5.
WAMU 88.5

Inside D.C.'s Long, Elaborate History Of Toasting

We head to D.C.'s legendary Round Robin Bar to learn about the District's rather particular relationship with the toast.

NPR

In Lean Times, Creative Bakers Turn To Desperation Pies

Vinegar pie and green tomato pie don't usually top the list of America's favorite sweets. But in Depression-era America, these and other desperation pies that survive today showed off home cooks' ingenuity.
NPR

The Farmer And The Commerce Clause

Even as it upheld most of the health care law last week, the Supreme Court limited federal power under the Constitution's Commerce Clause. Seventy years ago, an Ohio farmer sought to do the same — and lost.
NPR

'Black Eden,' The Town That Segregation Built

A small, out-of-the-way Michigan town is celebrating its unique place in America's civil rights history. From 1912 until the Civil Rights Act passed in 1964, Idlewild was the summer refuge of choice for thousands of black Americans looking to escape the shadow of Jim Crow in the woods of northern Michigan.

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