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Political And Cultural Splinters Are Deep In Ukraine

Protests run deeper than the country's recent turn away from the European Union. Former ambassador Stephen Sestanovich discusses Ukraine's history, long fractured by language, culture and politics.
NPR

After Tour, Medal For WWII Japanese-American Soldiers Returns Home

The Congressional Gold Medal was presented in 2011 to Japanese-American war veterans. After a round of museum visits across the country, it's back in Washington, in a new display at the Smithsonian.
WAMU 88.5

U.S. Diplomatic Ties To Ethiopia

In the Horn of Africa, solid U.S.-Ethiopia relations have been one constant in a region often beset by turmoil. We talk with current and former U.S. ambassadors to Ethiopia about the deep ties to the U.S., and where the two countries sometimes agree to disagree.

NPR

What Honest Abe's Appetite Tells Us About His Life

Abraham Lincoln is known as one of America's greatest presidents. Turns out, he was also a cook who used to join his wife in the kitchen after work. In her new culinary biography of Lincoln, a food historian walks us through his life with stories — and recipes — of what he ate, cooked and served.
NPR

The Origin (And Hot Stank) Of The 'Chitlin' Circuit'

This network of performance venues — nightclubs, bars, juke joints and theaters — formed during Jim Crow because black performers in the U.S. didn't have access to white-owned clubs. But what did chitlins have to do with it?
NPR

The Secret Operation To Bring Nazi Scientists To America

In the final months of World War II, the United States undertook an enormous effort to attract Nazi scientists to the U.S. Writer Annie Jacobsen's new book, Operation Paperclip, tells the story of that program.
NPR

For The Love Of Oysters: How A Kiss From The Sea Evokes Passion

Scientists have made some attempts to link mollusks to increased libido. There's even evidence that consuming heavy doses of an amino acid found in oysters can increase sperm count – in rabbits. But do any of these findings actually prove that oysters can — ahem — amp up arousal? Not so much.
WAMU 88.5

Sylviane Diouf: "Slavery's Exiles"

They are known as "maroons:" escaped slaves who lived on the margins of settlements throughout the southern U.S. A new book explores how and where they lived, and what day-to-day survival meant for those who fled slavery.

NPR

Remembering The Radio Stations That Got Loud With 'Black And Proud'

Going Black: The Legacy of Philly Soul Radio highlights a time when black radio stations were the only ones playing music by African-Americans. Host Michel Martin talks about the audio documentary with legendary music producer Kenny Gamble, who narrated the project.
NPR

Archaeology Find: Camels In 'Bible' Are Literary Anachronisms

New research revealing when camels were domesticated by humans shows that many depictions of camels in scripture may be off by hundreds of years. Renee Montagne talks to Carol Meyers, a professor of religious studies at Duke University, about what such anachronisms tell us about the genesis of religious texts.

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