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NPR

George Washington's Ice Cream Recipe: First, Cut Ice From River

George Washington had a powerful yen for coffee, according to records at his Mount Vernon home. A new exhibition reveals just how the Washington family cooked and ate.
NPR

Smithsonian Sheds Light On Founding Father's Slaves

Many Americans use Presidents' Day to reflect on the nation's core values, but the founding fathers often had complicated relationships with those ideals. A new exhibit explores that issue. "Slavery at Jefferson's Monticello" highlights the lives of slaves owned by the third U.S. president and the author of the Declaration of Independence. Host Michel Martin speaks with the exhibition's lead curators.
NPR

Forget Lincoln Logs: A Tower Of Books To Honor Abe

There's a new, towering tribute to the 16th president in the nation's capitol: A three-story sculpture of 7,000 books written about the 16th president. The sculpture represents less than half of the 15,000 some books written about Lincoln, says Paul Tetreault, director of Ford's Theatre.
NPR

Careful With That Fire, Drinking And Litter: 70 Years Of The Ad Council's Advice

Created during World War II, the Ad Council has launched one iconic public service announcement after another, from Rosie the Riveter to Smokey Bear. The nonprofit organization turns 70 on Saturday; what better way to celebrate than to take a stroll down memory lane?
WAMU 88.5

UVA Digitizes Civil Rights History

The University of Virginia is making an oral history of the civil rights movement available online.

NPR

John Glenn, A Hero Well Before Orbiting Earth

Fifty years ago, John Glenn was alone on top of a rocket waiting to blast into space and around Earth. In these times, when people can become suddenly famous for doing so little, Glenn's flight is a timeless reminder that the most amazing and marvelous inventions won't work without human skill and daring.
NPR

Hail To The Veep: America's Executive Underdog

The U.S. has had 47 vice presidents, and of those only 14 ever became commander in chief. With Presidents Day just around the corner, we salute those who never rose higher than second in command, proving it's possible to be a heartbeat away from the presidency and yet as functional as an appendix.

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